A Dealer-Made Pack Of 1971 Topps Cards

Whenever I manage to get to a show, there’s one dealer who gets a decent percentage of my “show money”.  Part of the reason for that is his vintage bargain bin, which sometimes contains small “packs” of 5-10 lesser-condition cards (both baseball and hockey) from the 1970’s.

This one was such a pack… For about the price of a pack of new cards, I got 10 cards from 1971. Yes, they’re commons that don’t do much for my team or player collections, but I’m fine with that.  It’s still more 1971 cards that I didn’t previously have.  For me, 1971 falls into the category of “I’m not truly working on the set, but I will take any and all cheap cards which come my way”.

I always think of Clay Kirby as a Padre, but he did play for the Reds and Expos towards the end of his 8-year career.
1971 Topps Clay Kirby
Kirby was an original Padre and lost 20 games during their 52-110 inaugural season.  In 1970, Kirby was no-hitting the Mets through 8 innings when he was lifted for a pinch-hitter (the Padres were losing 1-0).  To this day, no Padres’ pitcher has thrown a no-no.

Ed Stroud started and ended his career with the White Sox, but in between he played four years for the Senators.
1971 Topps Ed Stroud
His 1968 card says he is nicknamed “The Streak” because of his speed.  Obviously, this was before “streaking” meant something else entirely (Oh, yes, they call him The Streak… He likes to show off his physique…)

Gary Peters was the 1963 AL Rookie Of The Year with the White Sox.  He went 19-8 that season, went 20-8 the following season and lead the league in ERA twice.
1971 Topps Gary Peters
He was also known as a good-hitting pitcher, and in his rookie season he batted .259 with 4 homers, 12 RBI and a .444 slugging percentage.

Gil Garrido had a cup of coffee with the 1964 Giants, and it would be 4 years before he had another cup.
1971 Topps Gil Garrido
In 1970 he hit his one-and-only Major League home run.

To me, Jack Hiatt is the Major Leaguer who collects baseball cards… at least, that’s what the back of his 1973 card says.
1971 Topps Jack Hiatt
Hiatt’s another guy started and finished his career with the same team (the Los Angeles/California Angels)

Jarvis Tatum is the one guy in this “pack” that I had not at least heard of before.
1971 Topps Jarvis tatum
He played parts of three seasons with the Angels, including 75 games with the Halos in 1970.  That October he was involved in a 6-player trade that sent him to Boston, but the Red Sox released him in April of 1971.  He then signed with the Yakult Atoms of Japanese Pro Baseball.

John Boccabella… I can’t think of much to say about John Boccabella that I haven’t said before…
1971 Topps John Boccabella
How about video of a 1970 walk-off homer against the Pirates?

Chico Cardenas twice lead the league in intentional walks.  Not that he wasn’t a good hitter, but it’s not what he’s particularly known for, so I looked at a few random box scores from 1965 and found that he batted 8th.  Say no more.
1971 Topps Leo Cardenas

World Series Game 2, Orioles and Reds.
1971 Topps World Series Game 2
The Orioles did win this game 6-5 and won the series 4-1, but in Game 2, Don Buford had two singles, a walk and scored a run.  There are other players who are more deserving of being featured, but those players must not have had a cool photo (which also features Johnny Bench).

I’ve got the simulation game iOOTP on my iPod, and in a simulated 1969 season, the Senators and Athletics made an interesting, computer-generated trade:  Bert Campaneris to Washington for Frank Howard.
1971 Topps Bert Campaneris
Within some internal logic of game it made some kind of sense, and it might’ve partly based on some key player on either team becoming injured, but I thought it was interesting anyway.  Would you trade Hondo for Campy?

Maybe I should check with Alternate Universe Joe Shlabotnik and see if that trade may have happened over there…

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6 thoughts on “A Dealer-Made Pack Of 1971 Topps Cards

    • They come in oversized penny sleeve, but yep, they’re kind of homemade vintage packs and yep, they’re fun. I’ve got a couple of hockey packs from the same dealer that I’ll share when I get around to “opening” them (I’ve got a backlog in pretty much every aspect of my life).

  1. Wow, there’s a lot to love in this one. In that no-hit bid Kirby was pulled by Preston Gomez who did the exact same thing to my man Don Wilson a couple of years later when he was managing the Astros. Gomez always said he’d do it every time because he was being paid to win games, not lose no-hitters. He was a good baseball man.

    John Boccabella. What a fun name.

    I have absolutely no memory of Jarvis Tatum either.

    OOTP..I’ve got the demo version on my computer but haven’t ever played it.

    • I don’t know about the full-blown PC version (or the demo thereof), but the mobile version is fun, and a reasonable simulation. Not quite as satisfying as a board game, but you also don’t need an opponent.

  2. ODDLY, THE LATE CLAY KIRBY IS DEPICTED ON THIS CARD WEARING A BATTING HELMET WHILE HE WAS ONE OF THE WORST HITTERS …

    GARY PETERS WAS ONE OF THE BEST PITCHERS AT THAT TIME AND A REALLY FINE GENTLEMAN AS WELL …

    JOHN BOCCABELLA HAD THE GREATEST EVER INTRODUCTION IN BASEBALL HISTORY FROM THE MONTREAL EXPOS P.A. ANNOUNCER AND YOU HAD TO BE THERE TO HEAR IT …

    THIS WAS AN INTERESTING SELECTION OF PLAYERS THIS TIME.

  3. Boccabella roughly translates to “pretty mouth” in Italian. Got a love those languages like Italian and German that have literal meanings in their names.

    Last week at the All-Star game fan fest here in Cincinnati, Bert Campaneris was there along with Luis Tiant and George Foster. They were sitting at a booth that had a banner for Rollie Fingers who was there also. All three looks great and it was really fun to see them in person.

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