An Unexpected Number Of 1968’s, Part Two

Here are some more of the 1968 cards I got recently without meaning to buy as many as I ended up buying (but it’s all good)…

Dave Leonhard played 6 years for the Orioles, first as a starter, then as a reliever. He’s the last Major Leaguer to come out of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
1968 Topps Orioles Rookies Leonhard May
Dave May played for the Orioles, Brewers and Rangers, and is famous for being the guy traded to the Braves for Hank Aaron in 1974.

A 1968 Game insert featuring Matty Alou wearing one of those weird Pirates hats with the logo apparently on a patch instead of being embroidered directly into the hat.
1968 Topps Game Matty Alou
Matty Alou lead the NL in batting in 1966, and was in the top 4 in batting from 1967 to 1969.

Tommie Agee is capless because he had been acquired from the White Sox in December, 1967.
1968 Topps Tommie Agee
Agee won a Gold Glove and Rookie Of The Year during his first full season, but he disappointed in his second season, so the White Sox shipped him off to the lowly Mets.

In 1967 with the Astros, Mike Cuellar was an All-Star and a 16-game winner.  In 1969 with the Orioles, Cuellar won the Cy Young award.  In 1968…. well……………….. not so much.
1968 Topps Mike Cuellar
I’m guessing that Cuellar’s airbrushed hat means that it’s really a Colt .45 hat.  The team was the Colts from 1962 to 1964.  That’s the Shea Stadium scoreboard in the background, and Shea opened in 1964.  I’ll let you do the logic to determine what year this photo must be from.

Update:  I’d assumed that the airbrushed cap on Mike Cuellar meant that it wasn’t an Astros logo, but in the comments for this post Tony L. pointed out that *every* Astro in 1968 Topps has the cap airbrushed (or no cap at all), most likely due to the same legal dispute between the Astros and Topps that resulted in the cards saying “HOUSTON” rather than “ASTROS”.  Thanks, Tony!

Manny Mota, on a card I just liked.
1968 Topps Manny Mota
I so thoroughly associate Manny Mota with the Dodgers that it’s strange to see him in a Pirates uniform, even though he played six years in Pittsburgh.  I won’t get into his short stints with the Expos and Giants.

Another Game insert, this one of Tommy Davis, who I believe is in a Dodger’s uniform even though he played for the Mets in 1967 and the White Sox in 1968, because he’d been traded by the Mets in the Agee deal.
1968 Topps Game Tommy Davis
I didn’t intentionally include both in the same post, but it worked out quite nicely.

Al Ferrara played piano at Carnegie Hall as a child, and guest starred on Gilligan’s Island and Batman (as I’ve mentioned a couple of times before… Sue me, I think it’s cool).
1968 Topps Al Ferrara
I found this clip of one of the episodes of Batman he was in, I believe he’s the taller of the two henchmen carrying the boxes containing giant spiders (It’s 1960’s Batman, just go with it).

“Black Widow” was played by Tallulah Bankhead, in what was her final role.

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5 thoughts on “An Unexpected Number Of 1968’s, Part Two

  1. Enjoyed the info about Ferrara and the Batman clip. I’m a huge 60’s (and all years) Batman fan. Robin: “Batman, he’s almost on me!”
    Batman: “He is a she Robin, only the female of the species is venomous. And mine is almost upon me also!”
    lol.

  2. Never knew he was on Batman. Was he a part-time actor?

    Also I love your posts on the ’68’s. Topps 67 and 68 cards were the Holy Grail of the cards circulating around in my neighborhood in the mid 70’s. There weren’t many around and they were from a different era even though they were just a few years older than the early 70’s stuff we were trading. Uniforms and hair styles had changed and they were the last pre-divisional expansion set and even included some of the last Senators cards made.

    And I think the 1968 Houston cards did not have the Colt45’s/ Astros name on them. I thought I read (maybe here) that Houston’s ownership had some issues with Topps, the players union or both. That’s why the team name is not shown and all of their player cards are mostly head shots with black airbrushed caps.

    • You’re right; I don’t think twice about “HOUSTON” being on a 1960’s card because that was the case for many of the cards from 1965 to 1969, but I didn’t realize that *every* Astro from 1968 Topps had no cap logo. Cool stuff, thanks for pointing that out!

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