Whetting Our Appetites With Some 1967 Topps

After the less-than-enthusiastic reaction that greeted 2016 Topps, I’m guessing that many of us are looking forward to Heritage a little more than usual.  As this year’s Heritage set is based on the 1967 Topps design, I figured I’d share a number of cards from that set.

We can only dream of Heritage having a posed combo card like this one featuring Ed Kranepool and Ron Swoboda…  Kranepool & Swoboda might seem like “common squared” to many of you, but these two are both favorites among long-time Mets fans.
1967 Topps Kranepool Swoboda Mets Maulers
In Heritage, it’s more likely that we get two players who happen to be standing near each other…or even worse, photoshopped into the same image.

Lee Elia is probably best remembered as the manager of the Cubs and Phillies in the 1980’s, but he had a couple of cups of coffee as a player.
1967 Topps Lee Elia
He played 80 games with the White Sox in 1966, and 15 games with the Cubs in 1968. Despite his short career, he made it on to 4 cards as a player.

After seeing this card of Arnold Earley on several other blogs, I knew I had to add it to my collection. How many cards look like they feature a state trooper?
1967 Topps Arnold Earley
License and registration, please…

This is Earley’s only baseball card (not counting a 1978 TCMA card).  He pitched in over 200 games, mostly with the Red Sox, before getting this moment of cardboard glory.  He pitched 2 games with the Astros in 1967 before calling it a career.

Chuck Estrada is one of those guys who lead the league in wins one year (18 in 1960) and losses another (17 in 1963). He had a great rookie season, going 18-11, making the All-Star team and being named the Sporting News Pitcher Of The Year, but control issues and elbow problems were his undoing.
1967 Topps Chuck Estrada
Interesting stuff: In 1960, all three players who got votes for A.L. Rookie Of The Year were Orioles – Estrada, Jim Gentile and winner Ron Hansen – which would seem to be laying the groundwork for future success in Baltimore. However, none of the three were still on the team when the Orioles swept the Dodgers in the 1966 World Series.

On this card, Bob Buhl looks pretty damn menacing… like he’s auditioning for a movie role as “Henchman #1” or maybe a character named “Ruk” or “Mongo”.
1967 Topps Bob Buhl
“Mongo only pawn in game of life…”

Finally, the pièce de résistance… A 1967 Frank Robinson card which is gloriously miscut, colored-in and helpfully labeled to let us know that he was the A.L. MVP in 1966.
1967 Topps Frank Robinson
I love this card and even if I were given a better copy, I would keep this one.

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6 thoughts on “Whetting Our Appetites With Some 1967 Topps

  1. The 67 set was kind of like the Holy Grail in my neighborhood. They were very rare and basically untouchable in trade. I love the easy-to-read backs and the heavy card stock used by topps on that set.

    The nice thing about the Heritage cards sets is that you get to see cards from teams that weren’t around in the 60’s. But the impossible chase cards make me want to spend my money on filling in gaps in the original sets rather than on these newer ones.

  2. Looking forward to this years Heritage. I’ve been working on the 67 set myself. Last card I need is the Seaver rookie. Might take a while

  3. Looks the the horse got the better of this Mongo–right on the chin by the looks of it. If I’m right Elia was famous for saying, “If they don’t execute, I will.” I may be interested in Heritage but I know I’ll still be annoyed by the trademarks.

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