Vintage Football As “Plan B”

This time of year, Football is always “Plan B” for me… I can’t get enthused about football until baseball is over for me…  But in this particular case I had something I was 90% done with and planning to post today, but last night I looked at it and said “Naaaaah… Don’t like it”.

As a fallback, I figured I’d share some 1960’s football cards got the last time I went to a show.

…As it turns out, it’s a damn fine Plan B.

I’ll start with the oldest, from 1960 Topps Football.
1960-topps-football-john-nisby
John Nisby was a three-time Pro Bowler and one of the first African-American players on the Washington Redskins… in 1962.  I might be naive, but I had no idea that there were teams in any pro sport that hadn’t integrated by the 1960’s… Outside of the NHL, anyway.

As this is the first 1960 Topps Football card I own, I figured I’d share the back…
1960-topps-football-john-nisby-back
The “Football Funnies” became visible when you rub a coin over it.  It’s hard to see it on this card, so I’ll describe it for you…
Man in suit:  “So, you’re looking for a job.  Okay, I’ll pay you what you’re worth.”
Football player:  “Oh, no.  I won’t work that cheap.”

HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!!

This next card is from the 1966 Philadelphia set, and I love this card.  Something about the pose and Clarence Childs’ expression.
1966-philadelphia-football-clarence-childs
And look at that jersey!  It’s got SLEEVES!  Sleeves that come down over the elbow!  I love 1960’s football uniforms.

Childs played 4 years for the Giants and one for the Bears.  He’s listed as a halfback, but he also did kick and punt returns, as well as some defensive work.  He twice scored a touchdown on kickoff returns, including a 100-yard run on December 6, 1964.

The rest of these cards are from the 1967 Philadelphia Football set.

Gary Wood is wearing a Giants uniform and standing in Yankee Stadium, so it’s easy to overlook the relatively small line on  his card that says “NEW ORLEANS SAINTS”.
1967-philadelphia-football-gary-wood
Wood was a quarterback who set numerous records when he played at Cornell.  With the Giants, he slotted as the #2 quarterback behind Y.A. Tittle and then Earl Morrall, but got a lot of playing time due to those quarterback’s injuries.  After time with the Saints, he returned to the Giants to back up Fran Tarkenton and hold the ball for kicker Pete Gogolak.

Carl “Spider” Lockhart was a two-time Pro Bowler who played 11 years for the Giants.
1967-philadelphia-football-spider-lockhart
Spider ranks third on the Giants list of career interceptions (behind Emlen Tunnell and Jimmy Patton).

This next card features a great shot of Yankee Stadium…oh, and quarterback Tom Kennedy.
1967-philadelphia-football-tom-kennedy
1966 was Kennedy’s only season in the NFL;  he played in six games and started one.  He joined the team mid-season as a backup to Gary Wood after Earl Morrall went down with a broken wrist.

Kennedy’s one start came in the game that set records for points scored in a game:  Redskins 72, Giants 41.  There’s a fantastic vintage film about this game over at NFL.com… And The Sky Rained Footballs.  This is absolutely worth the 2:40 you’ll spend watching it.  This is still a record for most points scored in a game by a team and by both teams.  Although none of the Giants on these Philadelphia cards are mentioned by name, all four of them appear in the film.

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One thought on “Vintage Football As “Plan B”

  1. That defienitely was a great video. #51 on that return made several great blocks. Isn’t that the kind of score the NFL wants for every game now? That cartoon on the Nisby card sounds a lot like the the Marx Brothers (Chico). “What do you get not to play?” “You couldn’t afford it.”

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