The 1970’s, A To Z: Tim Cullen to Bobby Darwin

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


TIM CULLEN

1970 Topps #49

Played 1966 – 1972
1970’s Teams: Senators, A’s

1970’s Highlights:
Was a regular for the Senators in 1970 and 1971; His last Major League appearance was in 1972 ALCS

Career Highlights:
Named as the shortstop on the 1967 Topps All-Star Rookie team;

Fun Stuff:
Was a High School teammate of Jim Fregosi and a college teammate of John Boccabella and Nelson Briles; Cullen was traded to the White Sox before Spring Training in 1968, part of a six-player deal between the two teams… and part of the trade was reversed that August with Cullen going back to Washington and Ron Hansen going back to Chicago

Card Stuff:
Had a card in the 1970 Kellogg’s set; Cullen appeared in the 1972 Topps set as an airbrushed Texas Ranger (after the Senators moved to Dallas – Ft. Worth), but Cullen never played for the Rangers… He was released in March and signed with the A’s.

Bonus card (since it was used in a prior post, so what the heck):


RAY CULP

1972 Topps #2

Played 1963 – 1973
1970’s Teams: Red Sox

1970’s Highlights:
Was the Red Sox Opening Day starter in 1971; Tied a Major League record by striking out the first 6 batters he faced, 5/11/70

Career Highlights:
One of the few players to be an All-Star in both leagues – with Phillies in 1963 and Red Sox in 1969; In 1963 he was named Sporting News NL Rookie Pitcher of the Year, was named to the Topps All-Star Rookie team, and got a vote in 1963 National League Rookie of the Year voting (but finished a distant third to Pete Rose)

Fun Stuff:
After he retired from baseball he started a real estate company named after his career batting average: “123, Inc.”

Card Stuff:
Appeared in 1960 Leaf as a prospect but didn’t appear on a Topps card until his actual rookie season of 1963; Also appeared in the 1964 Topps coins set and the 1970 Kellogg’s set


JOHN CURTIS

1974 Topps #373

Played 1970 – 1984
1970’s Teams: Red Sox, Cardinals, Giants

1970’s Highlights:
Lead the 1973 Red Sox with 4 shutouts; Was the last Red Sox pitcher to bat in a regular lineup, September 28, 1972

Career Highlights:
Won a Gold medal with Team USA in the 1967 Pan American games; pitched three no-hitters (one a perfect game) for Clemson; Pitched in 438 Major League games and started 199 of them

Fun Stuff (for me and my fellow Long Islanders, anyway):
His cards in the 1970’s listed him as born in Massachusetts and living in South Carolina, but he grew up on Long Island and graduated from Smithtown High School (back when there was only one HS instead of East and West)

Card Stuff:
Was in 1981 Topps and Fleer, but not 1981 Donruss


…and that brings us to the end of the C’s. I’ve been wanting to do more to commemorate when we move on to a new letter in our A-Z, and this next graphic is a step in that direction:


JOHN D’ACQUISTO

1977 Topps #19

Played 1973 – 1982
1970’s Teams: Giants, Cardinals, Padres

1970’s Highlights:
Was named the 1974 Sporting News NL Rookie Pitcher of the Year and also named to the 1974 Topps All-Star Rookie Team; Lead the Giants in strikeouts (167) during his rookie season and set San Francisco records for most K’s and wins (12) by a rookie; Had one of the top fastballs in the game, having been clocked at 100 MPH

Fun Stuff:
His cousin is former Pirates pitcher Lou Marone

Card Stuff:
I normally wouldn’t chose an airbrushed card as my favorite card of a player, but this was such a good job that it was years before I realized it was an airbrushing… D’Acquisto would only pitch 3 games for the Cardinals before being traded to San Diego; Did not appear on a 1978 Topps card despite pitching in 20 games in 1977


ALVIN DARK

1976 SSPC #488

Played 1946 – 1960
Managed 1961 – 1977

1970’s Highlights:
As manager of the A’s he won 90+ games twice and a World Championship in 1974

Career Highlights (as a manager):
Won a pennant with the 1962 Giants; Also managed the Indians and Padres; Has the distinction of being fired by Charles O. Finley two different times (once in Kansas City, once in Oakland)

Career Highlights (as a player):
Was the 1948 NL Rookie of the Year with the Boston Braves; was a three-time All-Star with the New York Giants; Lead the league with 51 doubles in 1951; Batted over .300 four times

Fun Stuff:
Played college football at LSU and Southwestern Louisiana institute; As a player he appeared at every position except catcher

Card Stuff:
Was hired as the Padres manager during the 1977 season, appeared in 1978 Topps as the Padres manager, but he got fired during 1978 Spring Training and replaced with Roger Craig

Here’s a TCMA “The 1950s” card of Alvin Dark I picked up last year


BOBBY DARWIN

1978 Topps #467

Played 1962 – 1977
1970’s Teams: Dodgers, Twins, Brewers, Red Sox, Cubs

1970’s Highlights:
Had two seasons of 20+ homers and two seasons of 90+ RBI; was named the Twins’ 1972 rookie of the year

Fun Stuff:
Was originally a pitcher and pitched a single game for the Los Angeles Angels in 1962, three more with the Dodgers in 1969 and then was converted to an outfielder in 1970.  In 7.1 innings over four appearances, his ERA was 10.29 and his WHIP was 3.00

Card Stuff:
Was in the 1975 and 1976 Hostess sets


A song to celebrate our moving on to D

2 thoughts on “The 1970’s, A To Z: Tim Cullen to Bobby Darwin

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