Kellogg’s Cards & Vague Ramblings About Goals And Stuff

On those rare occasions where I can find relatively cheap Kellogg’s cards from the original 1970 – 1983 run, I am there.  For me, cheap Kellogg’s = Happiness… which is kind of amusing given that I made absolutely no effort to collect them back in the 1970’s.  At the time, I regarded them as baseball card wannabes, little plastic tchotchkes that came in boxes of cereal.  Real cards were printed on cardboard and came in packs with gum.  What can I say, I was a snob about cards.  (These days I’m mainly a snob about pizza, bagels and rye bread, but that’s another story).

…Which reminds me of one of my all-time favorite Hallmark cards;  the cartoon was of a man standing in a bakery, in the middle of racks full of loaves of bread, and he’s exclaiming “You call this rye bread?” and the caption was, of course:  “Kvetcher In The Rye”.

…But I digress…

1972 Kellogg’s Merv Rettenmund

There are days when you could ask me what my goals are for the original run of Kellogg’s cards and I’ll say “I want ’em all… All 850 of ’em.”

1974 Kellogg’s Willie Horton

…But that’s not entirely true.  Push comes to shove, my collection will be fine if it doesn’t include a 1982 Dwayne Murphy or 1973 Steve Blass (to pick two arbitrary examples, no offense intended for either player).  I mean, the 1973’s have only two dimensions, what fun is that?

1976 Kellogg’s Dave Parker

…But I can definitely see myself chasing after the 1976 set someday.  It has one of the nicer designs, and it’s right in my sweet spot as far as my initial “Everything Is Awesome” period of collection.  I’d made it a goal before – I probably said something about it here – but having it as a goal has only gotten me 16 of the 57 cards, and most of the 16 are commons.

1978 Kellogg’s Ron Cey

…Which brings it all back to “focus”.  I got this 1978 Ron Cey because it was cheap… but I don’t have a goal of collecting 1978 Kellogg’s in particular, I don’t collect Dodgers or Ron Cey, and visually speaking this card is perfectly fine but not particularly great – no offense intended, Night Owl – but it was available and there was something of a Kellogg’s feeding frenzy going on (not unlike me with a box of Froot Loops).

1979 Kellogg’s Chris Chambliss

There’s a post I wrote but never posted because it’s overly navel-gazey and whiney, but the gist of it is that I’ve been feeling guilty and overwhelmed lately because a lot of my hobby time and resources have gone towards “what the heck” projects;  meanwhile my collection is getting bloated and I’m not making progress on more important objectives.

1981 Kellogg’s Mike Flanagan

So I’m back to trying to work out what it is that I should be focusing on.  I would like some sort of Kellogg’s project outside of Mets and Orioles team sets and given that a number of my other projects have hit budgetary roadblocks, I could use a relatively easy win.  I was wondering if one of the later Kellogg’s sets might be cheap and common enough to give me an ego boost.  I don’t love the 1981 design, but I like the fact that they’re standard sized (and have plenty of background for the players to be “3D” against) is a  point in their favor.

1983 Kellogg’s Keith Hernandez

1983 Kellogg’s seems to be relatively common, but it’s not a great design and the cards are very narrow… again, that matters to me because more background means a stronger 3-D effect.

1970 Kellogg’s Ed Kranepool

1970 would be my dream Kellogg’s set to chase after, but for the previously mentioned budgetary considerations, it will have to wait for another day.

So that all brings me to my question for everybody…  Which year of Kellogg’s would you consider to be a fun but relatively inexpensive chase? 

At this point I don’t even know if a Kellogg’s set will be part of my goals for 2018, but I feel like it’s worth considering…  and I do want to have some sort of achievable goal to get me going, something similar (in terms of difficulty) to the 1968 Topps “Game” insert set. The answer may very well be “Dude, just knuckle down and work on the 1976 set!”

Thanks!

Coming Back On Stage To Play “Freebird”

Since I came back from “vacation” I’ve featured 2015 Bowman, non-sport cards, oversized oddballs and customs. I kinda feel like some of you might look at this like one would regard a concert by a famous rock musician who insists on playing all the stuff from his new album instead of the stuff that everybody really came to hear.

With that in mind, here’s a post featuring nothing but vintage cards which fit in a 9-pocket sheet… Well, except for one card which goes in an 8-pocket sheet.

I’m slowly working towards the 1968 Topps “Game” insert set, and here’s a card I just got featuring MLB’s PeteRose-a non grata…
1968 Topps Game Pete Rose
I’m not particularly a fan of Mr. Rose, but I like this card…  Not even sure why.  It’s kind of funny that the all-time hits king should have a “ground out” on his game card, but I guess somebody had to.  My own thoughts are that Pete Rose will eventually get in the HOF, but not until after he’s shuffled off this mortal coil.

In order to keep my efforts from getting too scattershot – yeah, right – I’m trying to focus my Kellogg’s acquisitions on Mets and the 1976  set… But that doesn’t mean I won’t pick up a cheap 1972 Kelogg’s when I see one…
1972 Kelloggs Dick Drago
Dick Drago was never a star player, but he was one of the better players in early Royals history.  In 1971 he was the Royals’ Pitcher Of The Year, going 17-11 with a 2.98 ERA, 15 complete games and 4 shutouts.

This 1972 Richie Scheinblum has a classically bad airbrush job. I think everybody should take a moment to appreciate the poorly-placed logo on the airbrushed cap.
1972 Topps Richie Scheinblum
1972 was Scheinblum’s only season as a regular, and he batted an even .300 while making the All-Star team.

I’ve been making something of an effort to get a better representation of the 1950’s in my collection.  Being a Mets fan from a young age, it’s not surprising that I have relatively few cards from before the Mets’ first season in 1962.  I’m also an Orioles fan, but I became one much later in life, so I don’t quite have the emotional attachment to vintage Orioles.  As a result, I’m often left with few budget-friendly cards to go after from the 1950’s.  Instead, I often go after guys who would later be Mets coaches from when I was a kid in the 1970’s.
1954 Bowman Eddie Yost
Eddie Yost was a Mets coach from 1968 to 1976.  Known as “The Walking Man” for his ability to draw a base on balls, he has a higher career on-base percentage than HOFers like Rod Carew, Joe Morgan, Honus Wagner, Tony Gwynn and Willie Mays (as well as Derek Jeter and Pete Rose).

I’ve been thinking of shopping for 1950’s cards using my 1956 modus operandi – go for the beautiful commons, regardless of who’s featured on them…  Cards like this:
1956 Topps Roy Sievers

If anyone’s got suggestions on any Bowman or pre-1956 Topps that fit this category, please leave me a comment (and if it’s a card you’ve featured in your blog, a link would be greatly appreciated). Thank you in advance!

Ya Get Whatcha Get: Triple Play Chicken And Other Delicacies

A couple of months ago I did a post about the three “Famous Chicken” cards I picked up on COMC. Shortly afterwards, I rediscovered another Chicken card that was already in my collection.
1992 Donruss Triple Play Famous Chicken
This card is from the 1992 Donruss Triple Play set, and I don’t really have much to say about it…

…So let’s move two years later to 1994. That year, O-Pee-Chee was in their second (and final) year of producing a flagship baseball sets that wasn’t just Topps cards with French on the back. Not long ago, I picked up a Cal from the set.
1994 O-Pee-Chee Cal Ripken
…und hier ist der back… (Don’t ask me why I suddenly slipped into pidgin German).
1994 O-Pee-Chee Cal Ripken back
These really are very nice cards, and have been the subject of some internal debate. “I should get more of this set!” is followed by “Oh, yeah, because we don’t have enough cards from 1994…”

I’m going to say something that may seem heretical to some Mets fans, and I don’t want anybody to think I don’t appreciate everything David Wright has done for the Mets and everything he brings to the team…
2011 Heritage David Wright
…but with the emergence of young Mets pitchers like Matt Harvey and Jacob deGrom, I am beyond happy that there are more and more inserts that feature Mets other than David Wright.

And finally I’m going to finish up with a career retrospective on Sonny Siebert that I will be sort of “live blogging”… writing it as I’m researching it. The main impetus behind this is my buying this cheap 1972 Kellogg’s card and then wondering “What did Sonny do to warrant a Kellogg’s card?” Prior to finding this card, Sonny Siebert was (to me) just another guy in the 1974 and 1975 sets.
1972 Kelloggs Sonny Siebert
OK, well the first thing I found out about Sonny Siebert’s 1971 season was that he as an All-Star, which goes a long way to explain this Kellogg’s card. He went 16-10, 2.19 that season. He was also an All-Star in 1966, while with the Indians.

He shares his 1964 rookie card with fringe-y Indians pitcher Tom Kelley, who should not be confused with Tom Kelly who managed the Twins for 16 years.

His 1965 card says that he was originally an outfielder, but switched to pitching in the minors. On May 10, 1964, he pitched 6 innings of mop-up relief during a Yankees blowout in the first game of a double-header, and he struck out 11 Yankees, including Jim Bouton, Mickey Mantle, Elston Howard and Clete Boyer. All four of those notable Yankees struck out twice against Sonny.

Moving along, his 1966 card says he was among the 1965 A.L. leaders in wins, K’s and ERA. Oh, look! There’s his picture on some 1966 League Leader cards. The photo used on his 1966 League Leader card was used on his 1967 base card.

Let’s see… he no-hit the Senators on 5/10/1966… He’s on a 1968 Topps ERA Leaders card… Traded to the Red Sox in April of 1969… Oh, he was also on a 1971 Kellogg’s card…

On June 19, 1970, Sonny Siebert was no-hitting the Yankees after 8 innings and had a 7-0 lead. Horace Clarke lead off the 9th with a single, which was followed by a double, a two-run single and a two-run homer… at which point Sparky Lyle came in for the save.

Sonny likes to go bowling! …That’s according to his 1973 and 1974 cards. He was traded to the Rangers early in 1973, but never appeared on a card in a Rangers uniform – A call to action for one of you “Cards That Never Were” guys (and if you’ve already done one, please leave the URL in the comments).

His real name is Wilfred… He was traded to the Cardinals after the 1973 season, traded to the Padres after the 1974 season (a fact noted on the back of his 1975 card), made six starts for San Diego before being traded to the A’s in May, 1975. He ended his career after 17 appearances with Oakland. 1975 Topps was his last baseball card, so he never appeared on cardboard with the Padres or A’s, either. Two more opportunities for custom card makers.

To wrap things up, baseball-reference.com says that Sonny is the last A.L. pitcher to hit two homers in the same game (9/2/71 against Baltimore).

OK, well sorry about the rambling but as the subject line says, “Ya get whatcha get”.