By Popular Demand: The 1982 Donruss Rod Carew That Never Was

Yesterday I featured these two Rod Carew cards from 1992; one Topps, one Fleer, both with the same photo.

Gavin from Baseball Card Breakdown commented “Someone needs to make a custom of this photo in the 1982 Donruss design to complete the trifecta.”

Gavin, I could not agree more!  Just because Donruss didn’t use the same image doesn’t mean that the photographer in question hadn’t also sold it to Donruss!

To finish off the set, here is the 1982 Donruss Rod Carew Faux Doppelganger:

Thanks for the great idea, Gavin!

 

1982 Rod Carew “Non-Parallels” (Not To Be Confused With Nonpareils)

Tony of the Off-Hiatus Baseball blog brought up today’s subject in a comment on one of my “Doppelganger” posts. I wasn’t going to write about it, thinking “Well, everybody knows about this”… but then I remembered that many of you weren’t collecting in 1982… Hell, a lot of you just *weren’t* in 1982.

And so…

Back in the wild and lawless days of the early 1980’s, when it was still a huge novelty to have more than one baseball card manufacturer, a photographer sold the same photo of Rod Carew to both Topps and Fleer. Whether it was an oversight or someone trying to pull a fast one, the result was that both Topps and Fleer issued Rod Carew cards with the same photo.

At the time, I subscribed to a hobby publication (given the year, I’m thinking Baseball Hobby News) and I’m pretty sure that the reporting of the day was that both of the card companies were not at all happy about this… not that this would be hard to imagine anyway.

To be clear, neither of these is a variation or a corrected error. They were both part of the full run of each set, so they’re not any more rare than the other cards in the set… unless someone has decided to buy up a bunch and sit on them, but given the prices I’m seeing on COMC and eBay, I’m thinking that’s not the case.

Post-Halloween, State Of The Collection & Some Fairfield Repack Cards

We gave away baseball cards for Halloween again this year.  It’s something we’ve been doing for a number of years… If you’d like more details about what we do, you can see the post I wrote last year here.

This year, we gave away 20 homemade packs of 28 cards each, for a total of 560 cards. It’s fun to give out cards for Halloween… The kids enjoy it, they get some decent cards – I make sure every pack has at least two household names in it – and I get unwanted cards out of the house.  Winners all around.

Lesson learned this year:  Putting the All-Star cards from Topps Update on the top of each “pack” just confuses the kids who are trying to pick as best they can within 5 seconds.  I could have a stack of cards of Robinson Cano and Derek Jeter in American League BP jerseys, and they’ll ask “Excuse me, do you have any Yankees?”

As long as I’m talking about getting cards out of the house, I feel obligated to do a “weigh-in”, something I haven’t done in 9 months.  Posting my progress in organizing & purging helps with both motivation (if I do well) and guilt (if I don’t).  I used to do these weekly, then I told myself I’d do them monthly, then I told myself I’d do them quarterly.  You can see how much I listen to myself.

Just so I don’t publish an image-free post, I’ve scattered some completely unrelated Fairfield repack acquisitions among my stats.

Net change in the collection since 2/3/13: -448  (2,505 added, 2,953 purged – I need to step up the purging)

1987 Star Steve Carlton All Star Stats

Total # of cards purged from the collection to date: 6,447

Net change to the # of cards in the house since 2/3: -4,268  (4,642 in, 8,910 out)

1987 Topps Mail-In Glossy Reggie Jackson

Total # of cards which have left the house to date: 22,598  (It’s sobering every time I update this number, because it seems like it must be a small fraction of what I actually have)

Number of individual cards tracked in my Access database: 47,022  (up from 20,418… and the organization continues…)

Number of cards that make up the complete sets in my Access database: 14,558  (meaning a total of 61,580 “confirmed” cards in my collection)
1982 Fleer Dave Concepcion

Four Mets cards, Four Decades

1963 Topps Al Jackson
You can look at Al Jackson’s 1962 rookie season in two ways:
Glass is half-empty: He lost 20 games and won only 8.
Glass is half-full: He got 1/5th of all the Mets wins for the season.

As you can see on the card, he was also on the Topps Rookie All-Star team, which says something about how much of a hard-luck pitcher he was that year.

1972 Topps Dave Marshall
One of my handful of 1972 High Numbers… You can tell from the scan that it’s got it’s share of creases.  Marshall was another All-Star Rookie, but that was with the Giants in 1968.  After the 1972 season, he was traded to the Padres for Al Severinsen, who was from New York but never got in a game with the Mets.

1981 Fleer John Stearns
John Stearns came from the Phillies in the infamous 1974 Tug McGraw trade, was an All-Star in 1982, but would only play another 12 Major League games after that season.

I really liked 1981 Fleer and  this 1982 set was a huge disappointment for me.  Blurry photos, “Meh” design… I’m generally a proponent of “Less is more”, but in this case it’s too minimal, or minimal in the wrong way.

1993 Donruss Diamond King Eddie Murray
I so thoroughly associate Eddie Murray with the Orioles that it still seems a bit odd to  me that he played two seasons for the Mets – even though I saw him playing first at Shea.

The Pirates New, Sweet, Sweet 1971 Throwbacks

The Pirates recently introduced some awesome 1971 throwback uniforms that they will wear for Sunday home games.  Although I’m not really a Pirates fan, anybody who’s been reading this blog for a while has probably picked up on the thing that I’ve got for the Pirates of the 1970’s, especially the uniforms they wore from 1970 to 1975.

Since the recent unveiling of these throwbacks, I’ve been itching to make a custom card or two featuring those new uniforms, but all of the pictures that I could find looked like they were taken with a cell phone from across the room.  I held off a while, hoping that “official” photos would pop up somewhere, but I haven’t seen anything.

In dismay, I asked myself “What kind of custom could I possibly make with a dark, blurry photo?”

…and that last phrase echoed in my head…

…dark, blurry photo…

…dark, blurry photo…

… And that’s when I realized that I could turn this situation to my advantage.  After all, it’s like my grandmother used to say…   When life gives you lemons, make 1982 Fleer customs!

1982 Fleer 1971 Throwback McCutchen

From what can be seen in the photos, it looks like they did a really nice job of re-creating the 1970’s uniforms, and I’m really looking forward to seeing these out on the field.  You can be sure that after the first Sunday home game, I will be creating some customs using early 1970’s card designs.