Kellogg’s Cards & Vague Ramblings About Goals And Stuff

On those rare occasions where I can find relatively cheap Kellogg’s cards from the original 1970 – 1983 run, I am there.  For me, cheap Kellogg’s = Happiness… which is kind of amusing given that I made absolutely no effort to collect them back in the 1970’s.  At the time, I regarded them as baseball card wannabes, little plastic tchotchkes that came in boxes of cereal.  Real cards were printed on cardboard and came in packs with gum.  What can I say, I was a snob about cards.  (These days I’m mainly a snob about pizza, bagels and rye bread, but that’s another story).

…Which reminds me of one of my all-time favorite Hallmark cards;  the cartoon was of a man standing in a bakery, in the middle of racks full of loaves of bread, and he’s exclaiming “You call this rye bread?” and the caption was, of course:  “Kvetcher In The Rye”.

…But I digress…

1972 Kellogg’s Merv Rettenmund

There are days when you could ask me what my goals are for the original run of Kellogg’s cards and I’ll say “I want ’em all… All 850 of ’em.”

1974 Kellogg’s Willie Horton

…But that’s not entirely true.  Push comes to shove, my collection will be fine if it doesn’t include a 1982 Dwayne Murphy or 1973 Steve Blass (to pick two arbitrary examples, no offense intended for either player).  I mean, the 1973’s have only two dimensions, what fun is that?

1976 Kellogg’s Dave Parker

…But I can definitely see myself chasing after the 1976 set someday.  It has one of the nicer designs, and it’s right in my sweet spot as far as my initial “Everything Is Awesome” period of collection.  I’d made it a goal before – I probably said something about it here – but having it as a goal has only gotten me 16 of the 57 cards, and most of the 16 are commons.

1978 Kellogg’s Ron Cey

…Which brings it all back to “focus”.  I got this 1978 Ron Cey because it was cheap… but I don’t have a goal of collecting 1978 Kellogg’s in particular, I don’t collect Dodgers or Ron Cey, and visually speaking this card is perfectly fine but not particularly great – no offense intended, Night Owl – but it was available and there was something of a Kellogg’s feeding frenzy going on (not unlike me with a box of Froot Loops).

1979 Kellogg’s Chris Chambliss

There’s a post I wrote but never posted because it’s overly navel-gazey and whiney, but the gist of it is that I’ve been feeling guilty and overwhelmed lately because a lot of my hobby time and resources have gone towards “what the heck” projects;  meanwhile my collection is getting bloated and I’m not making progress on more important objectives.

1981 Kellogg’s Mike Flanagan

So I’m back to trying to work out what it is that I should be focusing on.  I would like some sort of Kellogg’s project outside of Mets and Orioles team sets and given that a number of my other projects have hit budgetary roadblocks, I could use a relatively easy win.  I was wondering if one of the later Kellogg’s sets might be cheap and common enough to give me an ego boost.  I don’t love the 1981 design, but I like the fact that they’re standard sized (and have plenty of background for the players to be “3D” against) is a  point in their favor.

1983 Kellogg’s Keith Hernandez

1983 Kellogg’s seems to be relatively common, but it’s not a great design and the cards are very narrow… again, that matters to me because more background means a stronger 3-D effect.

1970 Kellogg’s Ed Kranepool

1970 would be my dream Kellogg’s set to chase after, but for the previously mentioned budgetary considerations, it will have to wait for another day.

So that all brings me to my question for everybody…  Which year of Kellogg’s would you consider to be a fun but relatively inexpensive chase? 

At this point I don’t even know if a Kellogg’s set will be part of my goals for 2018, but I feel like it’s worth considering…  and I do want to have some sort of achievable goal to get me going, something similar (in terms of difficulty) to the 1968 Topps “Game” insert set. The answer may very well be “Dude, just knuckle down and work on the 1976 set!”

Thanks!

Mets Monday: 1983 Kellogg’s George Foster

As part of my preparation for the rapidly-approaching National, I was updating my Kellogg’s wantlist.  Despite having grown up in the 1970’s, I’ve only got a handful of these cards and none of them were pulled from a box of cereal by me.  I don’t think my mother bought the “right” cereals for these cards, and at any rate, I didn’t get all that excited about them when I was a kid…  They weren’t real baseball cards, they were just these too-small gimmick-y things.

As the years have passed, I’ve gotten into oddball 1970’s stuff, but I go back and forth on Kellogg’s.  Some days, like this past Saturday, I look at what I have and think “I need to get more of these!” and I start to compile a wantlist of all the different Kellogg’s sets.  Then I might come back to them a day or two later and my enthusiasm cools (like when I finish the wantlist and see that has over 100 cards on it).  Part of my enthusiasm depends on whether I’m looking at the actual cards or at an image of the card, because without the 3-D effect they are pretty freakin’ cheesy.

I’m probably  not going to seek these out at the National, but if there’s someone who has some Kellogg’s cards, I’d like to be prepared (and not rely on my sketchy memory),