Doppelganger! 1994 Topps and Collector’s Choice Gerónimo Peña

Nick over at Dime Boxes recently featured a 1994 Collector’s Choice Gerónimo Peña card in his “Frankenset” voting.  Peña’s card lost to the 1991 Topps Walt Weiss (a most excellent card), but the Peña has something that the Weiss and other cards don’t have.

A Doppelganger!!!!!
1994 Topps - Collector's Choice Geronimo Pena

These were among the first – and maybe THE first – Doppelgangers in my collection.  A number of these doppelgangers occurred in 1994, and I’m pretty sure that’s when I started keeping them in a separate place in my binders.  (For those new to the blog, I keep a mini collection of cards which feature different photos of the same play, preferably from different manufacturers and different angles.)

I tried to pinpoint the play, but failed.  It wouldn’t surprise me if someone’s attempted this before, maybe they had more success.  The guy underneath Peña is Brett Butler.  Using the pretty safe assumptions that the picture was taken in Dodger Stadium in 1993, the best I could do was to narrow it down to the series:  April 13 – 15, 1993.  Both players were in all three games, but Brett Butler got on base far too often for me to figure out which particular play we’re looking at.

Doppelganger! 1994 Topps & Collector’s Choice Mark Whiten

While re-organizing my 1994 cards as part of my latest project, I realized that there was a previously unknown pair of cards to add to my sub-collection of what I call “Doppelgangers”.

My definition of a Doppelganger is a pair of cards from different sets that feature two distinct photos of the same play…  Preferably they would be at more or less the same moment, and the two cards would be different manufacturers.

Both of the “preferable” qualifiers apply to this pair of 1994 cards for Mr. Mark Whiten:

1994 Topps and Collectors Choice Mark Whiten Doppelganger

Both photos are from a Cardinals game at Shea Stadium, most likely from 1993… I didn’t think there would be enough information to figure out the play, but from the way Whiten is about to chuck his helmet, I guessed that he got thrown out at second.  Since there are no Mets around him, I’m also guessing that it was the last out of the inning and all of the Mets had already trotted off the field.

I decided to research it based on my assumptions, and once you factor in “Whiten out at 2nd at Shea in 1993”, it does seem to come down to this play…  June 26th, 1993:  Top of the 6th, Whiten gets on by fielder’s choice, scoring Ozzie Smith.  Whiten then gets caught stealing 2-6 (Todd Hundley to Tim Bogar), and that ends the inning.

Going through my 1994 cards made me realize there were some other Doppelgangers from the early 1990’s which I haven’t gotten around to sharing… I’ll make sure to bump those up in the schedule.

Since I started featuring these during the summer and some of you may have missed them, here are the other two pair of doppelgangers that I’d shared, along with links to the original posts:

1994 Score & Collector’s Choice Greg Meyers
1994 Greg Myers Score and Collectors Choice

1993 Topps & Upper Deck Rick Wilkins
1993 Topps - Upper Deck Rick Wilkins

Off-Topic And Buying Time: My Bottom Ten Beatles Tracks

What are the 10 weakest Beatles tracks? That’s precisely the question I asked when I started pondering ways to write a quick post.

For the record, I’m limiting this to official releases through 1970. No “Free As A Bird” or “What’s The New Mary Jane” here.

1994 Topps John Franco

Revolution 9, from the album “The Beatles” (a.k.a. The White Album) – I can still remember the first time I heard this, I spent 8 minutes and 22 seconds waiting for the actual song to start… and then it was over.

Good Night, “The Beatles”  – As far as I’m concerned, the White Album ends with Paul’s little doodle after Cry Baby Cry:  “Can you take me back where I came from, can you take me back…”

The Inner Light, B-Side to “Lady Madonna” – I first heard this in the early 1980’s, when I found the 45 at a yard sale. When I got it home and listened to it, the disappointment was palpable.
1972 Topps Paul Schaal

Till There Was You, “With The Beatles” – A show tune? Really? Well, I guess they needed something to play for the Queen.

Honey Pie, “The Beatles” – I would be far from the first person to state that The White Album is a tremendously uneven effort.

Mr. Moonlight, “Beatles For Sale” – The song doesn’t live up to John’s introductory wail.

1980 Topps George Brett

Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da, “The Beatles” – Years ago, this song would’ve fared much better. It has not aged well.

Bad Boy, originally on the U.S. album “Beatles VI” – not a bad song, but a relatively weak effort.

I Wanna Be Your Man, “With The Beatles” – This Lennon/McCartney song was recorded and released by the Rolling Stones a few weeks before the Beatles version.

A Taste Of Honey, “Please Please Me” – Herb Alpert And The Tijuana Brass is a guilty pleasure of mine, and I have to say that Herb’s version is far better. Heck, I even prefer the version by The Hassles, a Long Island “Blue-Eyed Soul” band from the 1960’s that featured a young Billy Joel.

1993 River Group Beatles Collection #145

Please note that some decidedly odd tracks like “Wild Honey Pie” or “Why Don’t We Do It In The Road” did not make the cut. Sue me, I like them….

…And I freakin’ love “You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)”!  Let’s hear it for Dennis! HA HEY!

So tell me I’m an idiot. Tell me I’m deranged. Tell me what Beatle-y travesty I missed while quickly whipping this post together.