An Unexpected Number Of 1968’s, Part Two

Here are some more of the 1968 cards I got recently without meaning to buy as many as I ended up buying (but it’s all good)…

Dave Leonhard played 6 years for the Orioles, first as a starter, then as a reliever. He’s the last Major Leaguer to come out of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
1968 Topps Orioles Rookies Leonhard May
Dave May played for the Orioles, Brewers and Rangers, and is famous for being the guy traded to the Braves for Hank Aaron in 1974.

A 1968 Game insert featuring Matty Alou wearing one of those weird Pirates hats with the logo apparently on a patch instead of being embroidered directly into the hat.
1968 Topps Game Matty Alou
Matty Alou lead the NL in batting in 1966, and was in the top 4 in batting from 1967 to 1969.

Tommie Agee is capless because he had been acquired from the White Sox in December, 1967.
1968 Topps Tommie Agee
Agee won a Gold Glove and Rookie Of The Year during his first full season, but he disappointed in his second season, so the White Sox shipped him off to the lowly Mets.

In 1967 with the Astros, Mike Cuellar was an All-Star and a 16-game winner.  In 1969 with the Orioles, Cuellar won the Cy Young award.  In 1968…. well……………….. not so much.
1968 Topps Mike Cuellar
I’m guessing that Cuellar’s airbrushed hat means that it’s really a Colt .45 hat.  The team was the Colts from 1962 to 1964.  That’s the Shea Stadium scoreboard in the background, and Shea opened in 1964.  I’ll let you do the logic to determine what year this photo must be from.

Update:  I’d assumed that the airbrushed cap on Mike Cuellar meant that it wasn’t an Astros logo, but in the comments for this post Tony L. pointed out that *every* Astro in 1968 Topps has the cap airbrushed (or no cap at all), most likely due to the same legal dispute between the Astros and Topps that resulted in the cards saying “HOUSTON” rather than “ASTROS”.  Thanks, Tony!

Manny Mota, on a card I just liked.
1968 Topps Manny Mota
I so thoroughly associate Manny Mota with the Dodgers that it’s strange to see him in a Pirates uniform, even though he played six years in Pittsburgh.  I won’t get into his short stints with the Expos and Giants.

Another Game insert, this one of Tommy Davis, who I believe is in a Dodger’s uniform even though he played for the Mets in 1967 and the White Sox in 1968, because he’d been traded by the Mets in the Agee deal.
1968 Topps Game Tommy Davis
I didn’t intentionally include both in the same post, but it worked out quite nicely.

Al Ferrara played piano at Carnegie Hall as a child, and guest starred on Gilligan’s Island and Batman (as I’ve mentioned a couple of times before… Sue me, I think it’s cool).
1968 Topps Al Ferrara
I found this clip of one of the episodes of Batman he was in, I believe he’s the taller of the two henchmen carrying the boxes containing giant spiders (It’s 1960’s Batman, just go with it).

“Black Widow” was played by Tallulah Bankhead, in what was her final role.

I’m Not Dead… I’m Getting Better… I Think I’ll Go For A Walk…

Although I haven’t gone anywhere, some of you may have thought I took a week off because many of the blogrolls have not recognized anything I’d done since last Friday.

Yesterday I found that my most recent post finally got recognized, and in celebration of that problem being resolved – knock on wood – I’m going to share some vintage cards I got at a show last month.

In 1979, when this photo was likely taken, Jim Palmer is starting to show signs of age – you can see the beginnings of crow’s feet, for example – but he still had great hair. This looks like it might be a postgame interview, and yet “Cakes” doesn’t have hat head. How the hell does he do that?
1980 Topps Jim Palmer

When I ran across this card in a box of relatively cheap, well-loved vintage, I was surprised that I didn’t already have it. I couldn’t tell you how much time I spent staring at an image of this card when it was featured on one of the 1975 Topps cards celebrating the company’s 25th anniversary.
1971 Topps Joe Torre

I just got curious and looked to see how many of those featured cards I own, and the answer is 6 out of something less than 50… “less than 50” because some of the cards, like the 1962 Maury Wills, didn’t really exist to begin with.

…And for what it’s worth, 4 of the 6 come from 1973 and 1974.

Moving right along…

Here’s a freshly-minted Expo and poorly-scanned card of Larry Jaster, who went 9-13 for the NL Champion Cardinals in 1968, and found himself an Expo in 1969. Funny how those things work.
1969 Topps Larry Jaster
I’ve had a thing lately for 1969 later-series cards which pictured players in the uniforms of that year’s expansion teams. I remember how excited I was about the 1977 Blue Jays/Mariners expansion, I think I would’ve been beside myself if I were old enough to follow baseball when four new teams came into the Majors.

Al Ferrara is another recent mini-obsession of mine ever since I found out about his attempts to get into acting. I really need to track down the episode of Gilligan’s Island he was on — he played “Native” in the episode “High Man On The Totem Pole”, which I’m ashamed to say I remember just from the title.
1966 Topps Al Ferrara
…You see, the castaways find a totem pole, and the head at the top of the totem pole looks like Gilligan. Zany hijinks ensue.

I’m diggin’ the capital “A” on Ferrara’s road jersey… I’d never noticed that before, but I like it.  Bonus point to the Dodgers.

I’ll wrap this post up with a contender for “Most uninteresting vintage baseball card of all time”.
1962 Topps Richie Ashburn
I’ll be honest – I would never have bought this card if I didn’t need it for my 1962 Mets team set.

I’ve got a bunch card show purchases to share; I really need to be better about keeping up on them.

And for those who were wondering if I’d include the scene from Monty Python And The Holy Grail which was quoted in the subject line… Would I deprive you of Python? Of course not!

Update:  I have angered the blogroll gods with my hubris… It’s currently 1 hour after I’ve posted, and I’m not showing up on blogrolls.  Poop.

1969 Cards Of The 1969 Expansion Teams

While going through some 1969 mid-to-high-numbers, I ran across a couple of cards that suddenly gave me inspiration on a new “subset” to collect from the 1969 set… Cards which show the new uniforms of that year’s expansion teams (as opposed to cards labeled as one of those teams while featuring a 5-year-old photo of a player without a cap).

Ty Cline doesn’t seem to appreciate his being on such a colorful card, but I appreciate it.  I seem to remember in Jim Bouton’s book “Ball Four” that there was a part where there was general grumbling about the uniforms of the Seattle Pilots, and I would imagine that’s true for the Expos and Padres as well.  The Expos uniforms were fairly radical for the time, and I don’t have much trouble imagining players saying “What, we have to wear this?”  The Padres uniforms were pretty traditional except for the brown, which probably wasn’t considered a “baseball color”, except maybe for the St. Louis Browns.

Al Ferrara is from Brooklyn, which doesn’t surprise me.  He looks like someone from Brooklyn, or at least mid-20th century Brooklyn.  Actually, this photo looks to me like a 1960’s sitcom actor posing in a baseball uniform.  “…and featuring Al Ferrara as Uncle Freddie!”

With that in mind, you can imagine my surprise when I found out he’s actually been on TV!  He did guest spots on Gilligan’s Island, Batman and Baretta.  From some quick research I did, Al Ferrara seems like an interesting guy, I’ll have to come back to him when I have more time to research & write.