Sugar-Frosted Black Friday: Some Kellogg’s Cards I Got From COMC

Even though I grew up in the 1970’s, I never got any Kellogg’s baseball cards.  That didn’t bother me at the time, because I didn’t view them as “real” baseball cards, but recently I’ve been trying to make up for lost time on my Kellogg’s collection.

This is the first 1973 Kellogg’s card I’ve ever seen in person.  You know what’s unique about the 1973 Kellogg’s set?
1973 Kelloggs Jon Matlack
They’re “2-D”!!!! That’s right, they’re just baseball cards, no extra dimensions involved. I can just imagine the disappointment of kids pulling these out of a box of Sugar Pops and wondering why it isn’t 3D.

For 1974, Kellogg’s came to their senses and added the third dimension back in.
1974 Kelloggs Felix Millan

Felix Millan takes that third dimension very seriously.  “The third dimension is a significant part of a nutritious breakfast!”

Just to wander off-topic for a moment, I’m already trying to figure out what oddball design to use for next winter’s “Hot Stove” custom cards, and one idea I’ve had is to use a Kellogg’s design, possibly the above 1974 design… Anybody have any thoughts on that idea?  When the time gets closer I’ll probably share a few prototypes, maybe even do a vote.

Here’s a 1976 Kellogg’s card, and of course 1976 = Red + White + Blue.
1976 Kelloggs Ken Singleton

I always liked Kenny Singleton, even though his time with the Mets came a few years before I started following the team. It says volumes about him that his 16 years in the Yankees TV booth are not held against him.

Another Jon Matlack card, this one from 1979, this time with the Rangers and this time with a huge facsimile autograph.
1979 Kelloggs Jon Matlack
Matlack went to Texas in a confusing 4-team trade which also involved the Pirates and Braves. O! The carnage! Players flying everywhere! From a Mets-centric standpoint, they gave up Matlack and John Milner and in return got Willie Montanez, Tom Grieve and Ken Henderson. Other notables in that deal were “Circle Me, Bert” Blyleven and Al Oliver.

Ed-die! Ed-die! Ed-die! What can I say about Hall-Of-Famer Eddie Murray that isn’t rehashing what you already know? Well, he lead the league in intentional base-on-balls three different years. How about that?
1981 Kelloggs Eddie Murray

In the early 1980’s, Hubie Brooks was among the young Mets players that every Mets fan had hoped would lead us out of the dismal mess the team was in. He was a good player, but one could argue that the biggest role he played in Mets history was being one of four players traded to Montreal for Gary Carter.
1982 Kelloggs Hubie Brooks
He played with Bob Horner at Arizona State University; in 1978 the Braves drafted Horner first overall and the Mets drafted Hubie third overall.

Four Mets cards, Four Decades

1963 Topps Al Jackson
You can look at Al Jackson’s 1962 rookie season in two ways:
Glass is half-empty: He lost 20 games and won only 8.
Glass is half-full: He got 1/5th of all the Mets wins for the season.

As you can see on the card, he was also on the Topps Rookie All-Star team, which says something about how much of a hard-luck pitcher he was that year.

1972 Topps Dave Marshall
One of my handful of 1972 High Numbers… You can tell from the scan that it’s got it’s share of creases.  Marshall was another All-Star Rookie, but that was with the Giants in 1968.  After the 1972 season, he was traded to the Padres for Al Severinsen, who was from New York but never got in a game with the Mets.

1981 Fleer John Stearns
John Stearns came from the Phillies in the infamous 1974 Tug McGraw trade, was an All-Star in 1982, but would only play another 12 Major League games after that season.

I really liked 1981 Fleer and  this 1982 set was a huge disappointment for me.  Blurry photos, “Meh” design… I’m generally a proponent of “Less is more”, but in this case it’s too minimal, or minimal in the wrong way.

1993 Donruss Diamond King Eddie Murray
I so thoroughly associate Eddie Murray with the Orioles that it still seems a bit odd to  me that he played two seasons for the Mets – even though I saw him playing first at Shea.

Mets Monday: 1993 Jimmy Dean Eddie Murray

Even though they did a pretty nice job of removing the Mets script from the front of the jersey, this lovely oddball is nothing exceptional as far as these Junk Wax Era oddballs go…
1993 Jimmy Dean Eddie Murray
…until you get to the back.

And that’s when I did the proverbial LOL when I saw the “drawing” of Eddie Murray.
1993 Jimmy Dean Eddie Murray back

Is that really Eddie Murray, or is it Detective Harris from the TV show “Barney Miller”?

Nah, Det. Harris would never mess his hair up by wearing a cap. To be fair, I don’t think Eddie’s HOF plaque looks much like him, either.

And as long as I’m making 1970’s references, I can’t look at this card, or anything related to Jimmy Dean sausages, without thinking of the David Essex song, “Rock On”.

See her shake on the movie screen
Jimmy Dean.

Jimmy Dean.

Rock on.

Enjoy your Memorial Day, everybody! I’m off to mow the lawn. Woo hoo.