I Don’t Normally Do Things Like This, But……… 1,000th Post! Yay!

Holidays and blog anniversaries come and go with little mention from me, but there’s something about the odometer rolling over that makes me want to do something special!

Something like…

…uhhhhhhhhhhmmmmmmm…

…like…

…like…

Oh, bloody hell.

What can I do that’s special?

Wait a minute… there is something I can share that’s truly one of a kind…

Back when I was a kid, I wanted to be the guy who worked for Topps and painted the new caps on guys who had been traded.  I loved baseball cards, I had a modicum of artistic talent, what better way to put those together into a career?

At some point I decided to give it a try myself… Only I didn’t have any idea of what they used to do this.  I went ahead and used what I had at hand:  The paint brushes and Testors paint we used for painting our model cars.  My canvas would be some doubles I had laying around.

The results were… Interesting.

Brushed 1974 Bill Robinson

Bill Robinson got traded from the Phillies to the Pirates before the 1975 season;  I don’t know if my artwork was necessarily done before there were any other cards that showed Bill Robinson as a Pirate, but I certainly gave it a try.  It’s a shame that the scan doesn’t do justice to my (*ahem*) interesting brushwork.

Some months before Robinson moved to Pittsburgh, a Chicago Legend got traded to the A’s.  Again, I made an attempt to update a card I had.

Brushed 1974 Billy Williams

The card already came with a yellow background, so maybe I shouldn’t have given him a yellow jersey… But I will point out that I sweated the details on this one and painted in Williams’ stirrups and sleeves.

This next card is kind of sloppy, but it shows that I wasn’t afraid to go rogue…

Brushed 1976 Ed Halicki

I clearly wanted to practice painting a guy into a yellow-paneled Brewers cap (which I always liked for some reason), but the thing is that Ed Halicki never pitched for the Brewers.  Maybe I had to make do with the cards I had on hand.

This next cards is fairly easy to put a date to… Manny Sanguillen was sent from the Bucs to the A’s in November, 1976, and then back to the Pirates in April, 1978.  This next card was clearly made in between those two dates:

Brushed 1974 Manny Sanguillen

My updating Joe Rudi into a Angels uniform is one of the worst attempts I made, but I give myself bonus points for painting the whole jersey white and trying to do the numbers.
Brushed 1974 Joe Rudi

This is another card that was probably attempted in 1977 (Rudi’s first year with the Angels).  In case you’re wondering what the deal is with that weird marking which runs from his face into the corner of the photo… that’s a printing flaw, and most likely the reason why I chose this card for my experimentation.

The last card I’m going to share with you is one where I’m not sure what I was doing… Maybe just cleaning excess paint off my brush. It made me laugh, though…
Brushed 1975 Reggie Jackson
It shows that my dislike for Reggie Jackson clearly goes back many years.


So there we have it, post # 1000.  I still enjoy the blogosphere, I’ve got hundreds of scanned images and many, many pages of blogging ideas, so I promise you I’m not going anywhere anytime soon… not unless all of you leave first, and then it all becomes fairly pointless.  It sounds trite, but it’s all of you who keep this fun for me, and I appreciate all the feedback I’ve received over the past 3+ years.

1976 SSPC #490 – Joe Rudi (A’s)

1976 SSPC #490 Joe Rudi

Joe Rudi… played in the Majors for 16 years, mostly with the A’s and Angels.  He was a three-time All-Star, a three-time Gold Glove winner and won three World Series with the A’s.  In 1972 he lead the American League in hits and triples, and in 1974 he lead the A.L. in doubles and total bases.

In 1976, Joe Rudi… won a Gold Glove and batted .270/13/94… But the most interesting thing about Joe Rudi in 1976 is what didn’t happen to him.  In June, A’s owner Charles O. Finley, knowing he was going to lose several players to free agency after the season, sold Joe Rudi and Rollie Fingers to the Red Sox for $1 million each.  Vida Blue was also sold, going to the Yankees for $1.5M.  Commissioner Bowie Kuhn declared these deals to be “not in the best interest of baseball” and voided the transactions.

Shea-o-meter:   Yep, it’s Shea.
Shea:  30
Pretty sure it’s Shea:  6
Can’t tell:  6
Not Shea:  5

Sudden thought to the back of the head: “Rudi” seems like the kind of name that was longer before family members came to the United States… perhaps the name was originally something like Rudicchiofirenza, Rudicziensko or Rudischestonbandgerät.

SSPC vs. Topps: blah.
1976 SSPC #490 Joe Rudi back