I’m Not Dead… I’m Getting Better… I Think I’ll Go For A Walk…

Although I haven’t gone anywhere, some of you may have thought I took a week off because many of the blogrolls have not recognized anything I’d done since last Friday.

Yesterday I found that my most recent post finally got recognized, and in celebration of that problem being resolved – knock on wood – I’m going to share some vintage cards I got at a show last month.

In 1979, when this photo was likely taken, Jim Palmer is starting to show signs of age – you can see the beginnings of crow’s feet, for example – but he still had great hair. This looks like it might be a postgame interview, and yet “Cakes” doesn’t have hat head. How the hell does he do that?
1980 Topps Jim Palmer

When I ran across this card in a box of relatively cheap, well-loved vintage, I was surprised that I didn’t already have it. I couldn’t tell you how much time I spent staring at an image of this card when it was featured on one of the 1975 Topps cards celebrating the company’s 25th anniversary.
1971 Topps Joe Torre

I just got curious and looked to see how many of those featured cards I own, and the answer is 6 out of something less than 50… “less than 50” because some of the cards, like the 1962 Maury Wills, didn’t really exist to begin with.

…And for what it’s worth, 4 of the 6 come from 1973 and 1974.

Moving right along…

Here’s a freshly-minted Expo and poorly-scanned card of Larry Jaster, who went 9-13 for the NL Champion Cardinals in 1968, and found himself an Expo in 1969. Funny how those things work.
1969 Topps Larry Jaster
I’ve had a thing lately for 1969 later-series cards which pictured players in the uniforms of that year’s expansion teams. I remember how excited I was about the 1977 Blue Jays/Mariners expansion, I think I would’ve been beside myself if I were old enough to follow baseball when four new teams came into the Majors.

Al Ferrara is another recent mini-obsession of mine ever since I found out about his attempts to get into acting. I really need to track down the episode of Gilligan’s Island he was on — he played “Native” in the episode “High Man On The Totem Pole”, which I’m ashamed to say I remember just from the title.
1966 Topps Al Ferrara
…You see, the castaways find a totem pole, and the head at the top of the totem pole looks like Gilligan. Zany hijinks ensue.

I’m diggin’ the capital “A” on Ferrara’s road jersey… I’d never noticed that before, but I like it.  Bonus point to the Dodgers.

I’ll wrap this post up with a contender for “Most uninteresting vintage baseball card of all time”.
1962 Topps Richie Ashburn
I’ll be honest – I would never have bought this card if I didn’t need it for my 1962 Mets team set.

I’ve got a bunch card show purchases to share; I really need to be better about keeping up on them.

And for those who were wondering if I’d include the scene from Monty Python And The Holy Grail which was quoted in the subject line… Would I deprive you of Python? Of course not!

Update:  I have angered the blogroll gods with my hubris… It’s currently 1 hour after I’ve posted, and I’m not showing up on blogrolls.  Poop.

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1982 Renata Galasso “20 Years Of Mets Baseball” Set

Back in the 1970’s and 1980’s, if you collected baseball cards you knew the name Renata Galasso.  If you didn’t know the name from the sets produced by Renata Galasso, Inc., then you knew the ads that were in national sports publications… Like this ad from a Street & Smith’s Baseball Yearbook in my collection:
Renata Galasso ad from 1978 Street & Smiths Baseball
…and in case you’re wondering why the ad says “1978 Topps Baseball” but clearly shows 1975 cards, it’s because the same basic ad was used every year, and they just updated the details.

Every year I looked longingly at the Renata Galasso ad, but I’d never actually ordered anything.  Later in life, though, I did pick up a set produced by Renata Galasso, Inc. in 1982 to commemorate “20 Years Of Mets Baseball”.  Despite the name, the set didn’t pay tribute to the entire 20 years, just the memorable first team that set a record for futility by going 40-120.
RGI 1962 Mets Casey Stengel

As you can see, the cards are pretty basic. The photos were black & white, and look  like the official team portraits used for newspapers, magazines and the like.
RGI 1962 Mets Richie Ashburn

The backs are simple, but appealing.  FYI, 1962 would be Richie Ashburn’s last season in the Majors.
RGI 1962 Mets Richie Ashburn back

There were supposedly only 2,500 sets created, but there’s someone on eBay who’s regularly selling lots of 5 team sets, so it would seem that they’re not hard to come by. I got mine at a show up on Long Island years ago – late 80’s, early 90’s if I had to guess.
RGI 1962 Mets Gil Hodges

I scanned these cards a few months ago, and I remember having a reason for scanning Vinegar Bend Mizell instead of Roger Craig, Marv Throneberry, Choo-Choo Coleman or any of the other ’62 Mets… But damned if I can remember that reason now.
RGI 1962 Mets Vinegar Bend Mizell
Was it to emphasize that the set includes even players who were only on the 1962 Mets for a couple of months? …Or to mention that Mizell served as a Congressman from North Carolina for 6 years?

I’m sure it’ll come to me sometime tomorrow, after we’ve moved on.