The 1970’s, A To Z: Vic Harris to Dave Heaverlo

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


VIC HARRIS

1976 SSPC #321

Played 1972 – 1980
1970’s Teams: Rangers, Cubs, Cardinals, Giants

1970’s Highlights:
Harris was named the May 9, 1976 NL Player of the Week after batting .464 with 7 RBI, 5 runs, a double and a triple; Was sent from the Rangers to the Cubs in the deal that also involved Fergie Jenkins and Bill Madlock

Career Highlights:
Played 3 seasons for the Kintetsu Buffaloes in the 1980s

Fun Stuff:
Played every position but pitcher, catcher, first; Was seen as having “superstar potential” early in his career; Did not get a hit until his 13th Major League game, going 0-for-36 to start his career


RORIC HARRISON

1976 SSPC #507

Played 1972 – 1978
1970’s Teams: Orioles, Braves, Indians, Twins

1970’s Highlights:
Harrison was the last American League pitcher to homer before the DH rule went into effect for the 1973 season, having hit one off of Cleveland’s Ray Lamb on 10/3/72; Six of his fifteen career hits were homers and three more were doubles; Despite the fact that I’m listing only hitting highlights for a pitcher, Harrison’s career average sits at .121

Fun Stuff:
Is the only Major Leaguer with the name ‘Roric’; While a minor leaguer, he was involved in the trade that all fans of Ball Four know: Jim Bouton to Houston for Dooley Womack and Roric Harrison… Harrison never played for the Pilots or Brewers, he made his Major League debut after another trade sent him to the Orioles organization

Card Stuff:
Was airbrushed in a Tigers cap in 1978 Topps, but never played for Detroit… he was released in spring training and pitched that season for the Twins, his final Major League outings


ANDY HASSLER

1978 Topps #73

Played 1971 – 1985
1970’s Teams: Angels, Royals, Red Sox, Mets

1970’s Highlights:
Made his Major League debut as a 19-year-old in 1971 and was the third-youngest player in the Majors that season; Had the third-best ERA (2.61) in the AL in 1974 but still finished with a 7-11 record; Started games in the 1976 and 1977 ALCS vs. the Yankees; One-hit the Indians on 7/2/77

Fun Stuff
Although Hassler played for six different teams and did two stints with the Angels, he was never traded for another player… He was either sold to another team or signed elsewhere as a free agent


FRAN HEALY

1974 Topps #238

Played 1969 – 1978
1970’s Teams: Giants, Royals, Yankees

1970’s Highlights:
Caught both of Steve Busby’s no hitters, vs Tigers 4/27/73 and vs Brewers 6/19/74

Career Highlights:
Selected in the 1968 Expansion draft from the Cleveland Indians; Was a broadcaster for the Yankees and Mets

Fun Stuff:
Healy’s father played in the Cardinals organization and his uncle, Francis Healy, played 42 games for the New York Giants and Cardinals in the 1930s

Card Stuff:
The featured 1974 card shows Thurman Munson sliding into home… a couple of years later, Healy would be the backup to Munson; Healy’s photo was mistakenly used on Steve Busby’s 1975 card


DAVE HEAVERLO

1978 Topps #338

Played 1975 – 1981
1970’s Teams: Giants, A’s

1970’s Highlights:
In 1975 he was a non-roster invitee with the Giants and not only did he make the team, but his 2.39 ERA lead the team that season; Went from Giants to the A’s in a cross-bay deal that sent Vida Blue to San Francisco; His 10-saves for the 1978 A’s was second only to closer Elias Sosa; Made 60+ appearances in four of his seven seasons

Fun Stuff:
Heaverlo seems like an interesting guy… He stuck with the non-roster uniform number he was assigned when he first made the Giants (#60) — one of his cards and a cartoon on Al Fitzmorris’ 1977 card referenced this as the highest in the Majors; He was the first player I was aware of to shave his head… Not surprisingly, his nickname was ‘Kojak’

The 1970’s, A To Z: Mike Hargrove to Bud Harrelson

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


MIKE HARGROVE

1978 Topps #172

Played 1974 – 1985
1970’s Teams: Rangers, Padres, Indians

1970’s Highlights:
Was named the 1974 AL Rookie of the Year and also the first baseman on the 1974 Topps All-Star Rookie team; An All-Star in 1975; Lead league in walks in 1976 and 1978; Was Involved in a triple play vs. A’s on 8/8/77

Career Highlights:
Lead the league with a .424 on-base percentage in 1981; Holds Rangers career mark with .399 OBP; Managed the Indians from 1991 to 1999, the Orioles from 2000 to 2003 and the Mariners from 2005 to 2007 and made the postseason five times; Inducted into the Cleveland Indians Hall Of Fame in 2008

Fun Stuff:
His nickname was “The Human Rain Delay” because of number of times he stepped out of the batter’s box and took pitches; Was a three-sport star in high school, but didn’t play for the school baseball team

Card Stuff:
Appeared in all five of the 1970s Hostess sets, and his 1975 Hostess is a rookie card; On the featured 1978 card, the #4 and black armband on Hargrove’s sleeve was for Danny Thompson, an active Texas Ranger who died of Leukemia at the age of 29 in December 1976


TERRY HARMON

1972 Topps #377

Played 1967 – 1977
1970’s Teams: Phillies

1970’s Highlights:
Did not have a plate appearance in the 1976 NLCS but did score a run after pinch-running for Bob Boone; set a Major League record for 2nd basemen with 18 chances in a 9 inning game, 6/12/71; his .284 average in 1972 was best on the Phillies; the first of his four career homers was an inside-the-park home run on 8/30/72

Card Stuff:
Shares a high #ed 1969 rookie card with Darrel Cheney and Duffy Dyer; Although he was a utility player his entire career, he appeared in every Topps set from 1969 to 1978


TOMMY HARPER

1970 Kellogg’s #74

Played 1962 – 1976
1970’s Teams: Brewers, Red Sox, Angels, A’s, Orioles

1970’s Highlights:
In 1970, Harper became the American League’s first-ever 30/30 player (31 homers, 38 stolen bases); Was named to the All-Star team in 1970; Receieved a first-place vote in 1970 AL MVP voting; Was the first batter in Brewers history and scored the first Brewers run; Lead the league with 54 stolen bases in 1973

Career Highlights:
In 1969 he lead the league with 126 runs; His 73 stolen bases in 1969 lead the league and established a still-standing Pilots/Brewers team record; Lead the league with 126 runs scored in 1965; Stole 408 career bases; Was named to the 1963 Topps All-Star Rookie team; Was the third player taken in the 1968 American League expansion draft

Card Stuff:
Played for the Angels for the first half of the 1975 season but never appeared on a baseball card with that team; His 1977 Topps card has his complete career statistics, as he was cut by the A’s during spring training and retired to become a minor-league instructor with the Yankees


TOBY HARRAH

1976 SSPC #264

Played 1969 – 1986
1970’s Teams: Senators, Rangers, Indians

1970’s Highlights:
Was the starting shortstop for the American League in the 1976 All-Star Game; Was the starting shortstop in the first-ever Texas Rangers game; Was the Rangers’ first-ever All-Star in 1972; His 109 walks lead the league in 1977; On August 27, 1977, Harrah and Bump Wills hit inside-the-park home runs on consecutive pitches by the Yankees’ Ken Clay; Involved in triple play vs. A’s 8/8/77

Career Highlights:
Was a four-time All-Star; Inducted into the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame in 2009; Managed the Rangers for the 2nd half of the 1992 season

Fun Stuff:
On June 25th, 1976, Harrah played an entire double-header without a single fielding chance; Was the last member of the expansion Senators to be playing in the Major Leagues; Threw a no-hitter in American Legion ball

Card Stuff:
Appeared in all five 1970s Hostess sets; His 1977 O-Pee-Chee card does not have the “AL ALL STAR” banner that the Topps card does; His name is incorrectly printed in black ink on his 1976 Topps card (this is an uncorrected error)


BUD HARRELSON

1970 Topps #634

Played 1965 – 1980
1970’s Teams: Mets, Phillies

1970’s Highlights:
Was the starting shortstop for the 1971 National League All-Star Team and was also an All-Star in 1970; In 1970 he tied a Major League record for shortstops by playing 54 consecutive games without an error; Won a Gold Glove in 1971; Was a member of the pennant-winning 1973 Mets; Is famous for the fight he had with Pete Rose in the 1973 NLCS; His 95 walks in 1970 was a team record until Keith Hernandez broke it in 1984

Career Highlights:
Was a key member of the 1969 “Miracle Mets” team; Inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame in 1986; Managed the Mets in 1990 and 1991; Harrelson is part-owner of the Atlantic League’s Long Island Ducks, and was the team’s first manager

Fun Stuff:
Appeared in an episode of Everybody Loves Raymond; One of many ballplayers to appear in a 1980 movie called “It’s My Turn”; Had an uncredited appearance in the 1968 Odd Couple movie

Card Stuff:
Appeared in every Topps flagship set of the 1970s; His 1971 Topps card has a ‘cameo appearance’ by Nolan Ryan; Had three cards in 1972 Topps (base, In Action, Boyhood Photos)

The 1970’s, A To Z: Don Gullett to Larry Haney

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


DON GULLETT

1977 Topps Burger King #6

Played 1970 – 1978
1970’s Teams: Reds, Yankees

1970’s Highlights:
Twice lead the league in win percentage (.727 in 1971 and .778 i 1977); Factored into Cy Young voting twice, finishing 7th in 1974 and 5th in 1975; Was the Reds’ Opening Day starter in 1973 and 1975; Made 5 postseason appearances and got two NLCS saves before his 20th birthday (1970); Was named the July 1974 Player of the month after going 6-1, 1.82 with 3 shutouts and 42 strikeouts; Over his postseason career (6 years) he batted .292 with 3 runs and 6 RBI and a home run; Injuries ended his career before he turned 30

Career Highlights:
1st round pick (14th overall) of the Reds in 1969; Inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 2002

Fun Stuff:
Gave up Willie Mays’ last home run (#660) on August 17th, 1973

Card Stuff:
His three different cards featuring the 1977 Topps design – Topps, O-Pee-Chee and Burger King – used three different head shots. Topps and OPC are airbrushed, the Burger King card featured here shows an actual Yankees cap


LARRY GURA

1974 Topps Traded #616T

Played 1970 – 1985
1970’s Teams: Cubs, Yankees, Royals

1970’s Highlights:
Got MVP and Cy Young votes in 1978, a season where he went 16-4 with a 2.72 ERA and two shutouts; Made 5 ALCS appearances from 1976 to 1978

Career Highlights:
Twice won 18 games in the 1980s; In 1969 he was an All-American and named to the College World Series All-Tournament Team; Was inducted into the Kansas City Royals Hall of Fame in 1992 and the Arizona State University Hall of Fame in 1978; Was an All-Star with the Royals in 1980; Never pitched lower than AAA ball

Fun Stuff:
Was a teammate of Bill Lee, Lenny Randle, Gary Gentry, Jim Crawford, Lerrin LaGrow and Craig Swan at Arizona State

Card Stuff:
You may notice that his 1974 Traded card (featured above) shows Gura with the Texas Rangers, but I don’t list the Rangers among his 1970s teams… That’s because in between his being acquired from the Cubs in December 1973 and his being traded to the Yankees in May 1974 he pitched only for the Ranger’s AAA team in Spokane


Larry Gura wraps up the G’s, and we now move into H!


ED HALICKI

1978 Topps #107

Played 1974 – 1980
1970’s Teams: Giants

1970’s Highlights:
Threw a no-hitter against the Mets on 8/24/75 and struck out 10 Mets while walking just two;  one-hit the Expos in 1978; Had a streak of 25.2 consecutive scoreless innings in 1976; Lead the league with a 1.060 WHIP in 1978; Won 16 games in 1977

Fun Stuff:
I don’t know if there is a relationship, but there was a back named Ed Halicki who played in the NFL from 1929 to 1930 for the Frankford Yellow Jackets and the Minneapolis Red Jackets (which, as I discovered, was not just the Yellow Jackets relocating and changing their color)


BILL HANDS

1973 Topps #555

Played 1965 – 1975
1970’s Teams: Cubs, Twins, Rangers

1970’s Highlights:
Won 18 games in 1970 as part of an impressive top of the rotation with teammates Fergie Jenkins (22 wins) and Ken Holtzman (17 wins)

Career Highlights:
Won 20 games with the 1969 Cubs; originally came up in the Giants organization and went to the Cubs (along with Randy Hundley) for Lindy McDaniel and Don Landrum

The transaction which left this Mets fan dumbfounded:
On February 24, 1976 the Rangers traded Bill Hands to the Mets for George Stone.

I saw that transaction line and said “Bill Hands was on the METS?”

[pause]

“GEORGE STONE WAS ON THE RANGERS????”

From what I can tell, both pitchers decided to retire before the 1976 season.

Card Stuff:
Although he last pitched in 1975, Hands appears in both 1976 Topps and 1976 SSPC


LARRY HANEY

1970 Topps #648

Played 1966 – 1978
1970’s Teams: A’s, Cardinals, Brewers

1970’s Highlights:
Played in two games in the 1974 World Series, but didn’t get a plate appearance; Was a backup catcher through most of his career, but was valued enough to play for 12 Major League seasons

Career Highlights:
Was an original Seattle Pilot before being traded to the A’s for 2nd baseman John Donaldson; Homered in his Major League Debut in 1965, the only Oriole to do so until Jonathan Schoop duplicated the feat in 2013

Fun Stuff:
Larry’s son Chris Haney pitched in the majors from 1991 to 2002 and Larry’s cousin is Mike Cubbage (who got the 1970s: A-Z treatment back in September); Haney acquired by the A’s three times, twice after being sold by the A’s and then brought back again

Card Stuff:
The negative on his 1969 Topps card was reversed and made him appear to be a left-handed catcher; Haney’s 1975 Topps card actually shows fellow catcher Dave Duncan


BONUS VIDEO

I ran across this brief clip and thought it worth sharing; it’s a segment of what appears to be a TV news report on Ed Halicki’s no-hitter and shows the last out being recorded.  The batter is Wayne Garrett, the first baseman is Willie Montañez.  The first player running over is 2nd baseman Derrell Thomas, the catcher is Dave Rader, then we see shortstop Chris Speier and 3rd baseman Bruce Miller, and I think that #5 who runs over at the end is coach Joey Amalfitano

The 1970’s, A To Z: Wayne Gross to Ron Guidry

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


WAYNE GROSS

1978 Topps #139

Played 1976 – 1986
1970’s Teams: A’s

1970’s Highlights:
Was named to the 1977 Topps All-Star Rookie team and was the A’s representative at the 1977 All-Star Game; Involved in a Major League record three Triple Plays in 1979 – May 7th vs. the Orioles, June 19th vs. the Royals and June 23rd vs. the Rangers

Career Highlights:
Hit a homer in the 1981 ALDS; Pitched 2.1 scoreless innings in a 16-5 loss to the Twins 5/18/83


JERRY GROTE

1976 Topps #143

Played 1963 – 1981
1970’s Teams: Mets, Dodgers

1970’s Highlights:
Was named to the All-Star team in 1974; Played in the 1973 World Series with the Mets and the 1977 and 1978 World Series with the Dodgers; Set a Major League record with 20 putouts in the 1970 game where Tom Seaver struck out 19 Padres

Career Highlights:
A member of the 1969 “Miracle Mets”, Grote was inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame in 1992; caught a 24-inning game without an error in 1968

Fun Stuff:
Grote and several other 1969 Mets appeared in an episode of the TV series “Everybody Loves Raymond”; On September 27, 1963 the Houston Colt .45’s had a starting lineup made up entirely of rookies, including Grote, Joe Morgan, Jim Wynn and Rusty Staub

Card Stuff:
Had cards in the 1971 Topps “Baseball’s Greatest Moments” set and in 1976 Hostess; Didn’t appear in 1977 Topps despite playing in 101 games in 1976


JOHNNY GRUBB

1976 SSPC #130

Played 1972 – 1987
1970’s Teams: Padres, Indians, Rangers

1970’s Highlights:
Represented the Padres in the 1974 All-Star Game; was named to the 1973 Topps All-Star Rookie team; Was named as an outfielder on the 1970 College World Series All-Tournament team; set a Padres record with 36 doubles in 1975 (He’s currently tied for 16th on the Padres list with Tony Gwynn and Bip Roberts)

Career Highlights:
While with the Tigers he got a hit in the 1984 World Series; Made his last MLB appearance in the 1987 ALCS vs. the Twins

Fun Stuff:
Was a college teammate of pitcher Mac Scarce at Florida State

Card Stuff:
His 1975 Kellogg’s card says that he collects baseball cards “such as this one”; His 1977 O-Pee-Chee card has an airbrushed photo after he was traded to Cleveland; His 1974 rookie card has a “Washington Nat’l Lea.” variation


JOE GRZENDA

1971 Topps #518

Played 1961 – 1972
1970’s Teams: Senators, Cardinals

1970’s Highlights:
Joe is here mainly as an answer to several trivia questions… He threw the final pitch and got the final out in Senators history before fans stormed the field and caused the game to be forfeited to the Yankees; Got the Senators’ final win two days earlier and final save before that

Card Stuff:
Pitched in 56 games scattered over four Major League seasons before getting a rookie card in 1969 Topps (14 years after he broke into pro ball as an 18-year-old)


RON GUIDRY

1978 Topps #135

Played 1975 – 1988
1970’s Teams: Yankees

1970’s Highlights:
In 1978 he won the Cy Young Award and was named The Sporting News MLB Player of the Year while leading the league with 25 wins, a 1.74 ERA and 9 shutouts (a Yankees team record)… he also struck out 248 batters (also a Yankees record) and pitched 16 complete games; Received 8 first place votes in 1978 MVP voting and finished second to Jim Rice; His .893 winning percentage (25-3) in 1978 is a Major League record for a starting pitcher;  Lead the league in ERA (2.78) in 1979;  Struck out 18 Angels on June 16, 1978 to set a Yankees team record and an American League record for lefties; Was the Yankees’ opening day starter in 1978 and 1979;

Career Highlights:
Was a four-time All-Star;  Won five consecutive Gold Glove awards in the 1980s;  Also won 20 games in 1983 and 1985;  Won the Roberto Clemente Award in 1984;  Has three career World Series wins and 2 career ALCS wins

Fun Stuff:
His nicknames are “Louisiana Lightning” and “Gator”;  Gave up Dick Allen’s final homer (#351) in 1977

Card Stuff:
Guidry’s 1979 Topps Burger King card uses the photo from his 1979 Topps “Record Breaker” subset card

The 1970’s, A To Z: Tom Grieve to Greg Gross

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


TOM GRIEVE

1976 Hostess #130

Played 1970 – 1979
1970’s Teams: Senators, Rangers, Mets, Cardinals

1970’s Highlights:
Was part of a four-team deal between the Rangers, Mets, Pirates and Braves, which also involved Al Oliver, Jon Matlack, WIllie Montañez and HOFer Bert Blyleven

Career Highlights:
Was the Senators’ 1st round draft pick in 1966; Was the Rangers’ General Manager from 1984 to 1994; Is part of the Rangers’ broadcast team; Was inducted into the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame in 2010

Fun Stuff:
Grieve had two sons who played professionally: Ben Grieve was also a 1st round draft pick; Tim Grieve pitched four seasons in the Royals organization, but did get a “Draft Picks” card in 1994 Topps Traded


KEN GRIFFEY

1976 SSPC #40

Played 1973 – 1991
1970’s Teams: Reds

1970’s Highlights:
Starting right fielder for the “Big Red Machine” teams of the 1970s; Lost the 1976 batting title to Bill Madlock on the last day of the season… Madlock went 4-for 4 to finish at .339 and Griffey, who had been leading going in, went 0-for-2 to finish at .336; In 1975 he scored the go-ahead run in the clinching games for the NLCS and the World Series; Scored 90+ runs in four straight seasons, 1975 – 1978

Career Highlights:
Inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 2004; Is the only player to win three World Championships with the Reds; MVP of the 1980 All-Star Game; Batted .296 over his 19-year career

The Elephant In The Room:
Of course, Ken Griffey is father to Ken Griffey, Jr.

Fun Stuff:
Griffey, Griffey Jr. and Stan Musial all came from the small town of Donora, PA;

Card Stuff:
His 1977 O-Pee-Chee card had a different photo than the 1977 Topps card


DOUG GRIFFIN

1976 SSPC #412

Played 1970 – 1977
1970’s Teams: Angels, Red Sox

1970’s Highlights:
Won the Gold Glove award in 1972; After his 1971 rookie season he got 3 (out of 24) AL Rookie of the Year votes, was named the Red Sox rookie of the year and was named to the Topps All-Star Rookie team; Was the Red Sox starting 2nd baseman from 1971 to 1975; Played 18 games for the Angels in 1970 before being sent to Boston in a trade which sent Boston favorite Tony Conigliaro to California


ROSS GRIMSLEY

1979 Hostess #5

Played 1971 – 1982
1970’s Teams: Reds, Orioles, Expos

1970’s Highlights:
Won 20 games in 1978, the most wins in a season by a Montreal Expos pitcher; Also got his only All-Star nod in 1978; Was named the LHP on the 1971 Topps All-Star Rookie team; Threw a two-hitter in the 1972 NLCS vs. the Pirates; Won 18 games and struck out 158 with the Orioles in 1974; Got wins in games 5 & 6 of the 1972 World Series

Career Highlights:
Was the pitching coach for a number of minor league teams from 1984 to 2014

Fun Stuff:
His father, also named Ross, pitched for the White Sox in 1951; His nicknames are “Crazy Eyes” and “Scuz”; Gave up Robin Yount’s first and second MLB homers… 2 months apart


GREG GROSS

1979 Topps Burger King Phillies #22

Played 1973 – 1989
1970’s Teams: Astros, Cubs, Phillies

1970’s Highlights:
Was named the 1974 Sporting News NL Rookie of the Year and finished 2nd to Bake McBride in the ROY award voted on by the sportswriters; Was named to the 1974 Topps All-Star Rookie team; His 185 hits in 1974 set an Astros team record, one which would be broken in 1978 by Enos Cabell (and by others after that)

Career Highlights:
His 143 career pinch hits was 5th all time heading into the 2020 season (and I’m pretty sure nobody was in a position to pass him this past season); Appeared in the postseason in 3 different seasons with the Phillies and won a World Championship in 1980

Fun Stuff:
Although Gross appeared in 1,809 games over 17 seasons, he hit only 7 career home runs, and 5 of those home runs were hit in 1977;  Pitched twice in the 1980s… Pitching for the Phils against the Expos in 1986 he struck out two while giving up a double and a walk (but no runs) to close out an 8-0 loss, and pitching for the Astros against the Pirates in 1989 he again closed out a blowout loss but allowed 2 runs, 3 hits and a walk while pitching the 9th

Card Stuff:
The featured card, from the 1979 Topps Burger King Phillies regional set, serves as a sort of ‘Traded’ card because Gross appears in 1979 Topps as a Cub; Gross is one of the few players to have Hostess and Kellogg’s rookie cards (1975)

The 1970’s, A To Z: Danny Goodwin to Bobby Grich

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


DANNY GOODWIN

1979 Topps #322

Played 1975 – 1982
1970’s Teams: Angels, Twins

1970’s Highlights:
I wanted to include Danny Goodwin because he remains the only player ever to have been drafted 1st overall TWICE… By the White Sox in 1971 and by the Angels in 1975; As a catcher in college, Goodwin was a three-time All-American, was named the 1975 College Player of the Year and was part of the USA National Team; As a pro, an arm injury forced him to become a 1B/DH;  His best offensive Major League season came in 1979 with the Twins when he hit .289 with 5 homers and 27 RBI over 58 games

Career Highlights:
Inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2011


RICH “GOOSE” GOSSAGE

1978 Kellogg’s #8

Played 1972 – 1994
1970’s Teams: White Sox, Pirates, Yankees

1970’s Highlights:
Won the Fireman of the Year award in 1975 and 1978; Had three seasons in the 1970’s where he appeared in at least 62 games and had an ERA of 2.01 or less; Shut down the Dodgers for the final two innings of the clinching game of the 1978 World Series (although the Yankees had too big of a lead to get Gossage the Save);

Career Highlights:
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2008; Got Cy Young and MVP votes in 5 different seasons; Finished his career with 310 saves and a 3.01 ERA; Got 52 saves of at least 7 outs

Fun Stuff:
Was the last White Sox pitcher to bat before the DH; In 1976 White Sox manager Paul Richards put Gossage and fellow reliever Terry Forster in the starting rotation, an experiment which didn’t have great results for Gossage (9-17, 3.94)

Card Stuff:
The featured card is the only nationally-distributed card to show Gossage in an actual Pirates uniform (He was airbrushed into a Pirates cap in 1977 Hostess); His 31 game stint with the Giants in 1989 was reflected only by a Mother’s Cookies card


WAYNE GRANGER

1976 Topps #516

Played 1968 – 1976
1970’s Teams: Reds, Twins, Cardinals, Yankees, White Sox, Astros, Expos

1970’s Highlights:
Granger was inducted into the Reds HOF in 1982 despite having pitched only 3 seasons for the team; Got the final out and the final win at Cincinnati’s Crosley Field, 6/24/1970; Was Fireman of the year in 1970 and lead the league with 35 saves

Career Highlights:
Set a NL record (since broken) and a Reds team record (still standing) in 1969 with 90 relief appearances

Card Stuff:
Had his cap airbrushed in 3 straight Topps sets: 1972 (Twins), 1973 (Cardinals) and 1974 (Yankees)


JIM “MUDCAT” GRANT

1972 Topps #111

Played 1958 – 1971
1970’s Teams: A’s, Pirates

1970’s Highlights:
Made his last career appearance in game 3 of the 1971 ALCS; Lead the Majors with 80 games pitched in 1970 but because he split the season between Oakland and Pittsburgh he didn’t lead either league in that category

Career Highlights:
Won 21 games with 6 shutouts in 1965; was an All-Star in 1963 and 1965; Threw two complete games and got both wins in the 1965 World Series against the Dodgers, but the Twins would lose to the Bums in 7 games; Was selected by the Expos in the 1968 expansion draft and started the Expos first game;

Fun Stuff:
Had a Jazz band called “Mudcat and the Kittens”;  His nephew, Dominic Brown, played for the Phillies from 2010 to 2015

Card Stuff:
Appeared in the 1972 set but didn’t pitch in the Majors after 1971; Didn’t appear in 1970 Topps despite pitching in 41 games in 1969


BOBBY GRICH

1974 Topps #109

Played 1970 – 1986
1970’s Teams: Orioles, Angels

1970’s Highlights:
Won 4 Gold Gloves; Was the starting AL All-Star shortstop in 1972 and 2nd baseman in 1976; Was also an All-Star in 1974 and 1979; Was in the top 10 in on-base percentage from 1973 to 1976; was involved in two Triple plays – 7/7/73 vs A’s, 9/20/73 vs. Tigers;

Career Highlights:
Was inducted into the Angels HOF in 1988 and the Orioles HOF in 1998; Lead the AL in the strike-shortened 1981 season with 22 homers and a .543 On-Base Percentage;

Card Stuff:
His 1977 O-Pee-Chee card has a different photo

The 1970’s, A To Z: Gary Gentry to Dave Goltz

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


GARY GENTRY

1973 Topps #288

Played 1969 – 1975
1970’s Teams: Mets, Braves

1970’s Highlights:
Threw two one-hitters with the Mets, with each hit by a future HOFer; in 1970 he one-hit the Cubs with the only hit coming on an Ernie Banks single in the 8th; In 1971 he one-hit the Pirates with Roberto Clemente hitting a run-scoring triple in the 6th; After being acquired in an offseason trade involving Félix Millan, Danny Frisella and George Stone, Gentry was the Braves Opening Day Starter, 1973; Injuries kept him from living up to the promise of his 1969 rookie season and college dominance

Career Highlights:
Was with the 1969 “Miracle Mets” and was the winning pitcher over Jim Palmer in Game 3 of the World Series, pitching 6.2 shutout innings and hitting a 2-run double; As a college pitcher in 1967, The Sporting News named Gentry the National Player of the Year after he struck out 229 batters (then a record), finished with a 17-1 record and a 1.14 ERA. In that year’s College World Series he pitched 23 innings over 2 starts, striking out 31 and giving up just 2 runs; Gentry has been inducted into the Arizona State and NCAA baseball Halls of Fame; Pitched a shutout against the Cardinals to clinch the NL East in 1969

Fun Stuff:
Was a college teammate of Larry Gura

Card Stuff:
Thanks to an article about Topps Cards in Dynamite Magazine, this 1973 card of Gentry was my introduction to the concept of Topps modifying an image (and a pretty decent job of it, too)


CÉSAR GERÓNIMO

1976 SSPC #45

Played 1969 – 1983
1970’s Teams: Astros, Reds

1970’s Highlights:
César Gerónimo, known for his glove and strong throwing arm, was the starting center fielder on the Big Red Machine teams of the 1970’s; He won four Gold Gloves from 1974 to 1977, played in 3 World Series and won World Championships in 1975 and 1976; Came to the Reds in the same 8-player deal which brought Joe Morgan and Jack Billingham from Houston

Career Highlights:
Inducted into Reds Hall of Fame in 2008

Fun Stuff:
Gerónimo was the victim of Bob Gibson’s 3000th strikeout in 1974 and would also be Ryan’s 3000th K in 1980;  Was originally in the Yankees organization until the Astros selected him in the 1968 Rule V Draft


BOB GIBSON

1970 Topps Super #33

Played 1959 – 1975
1970’s Teams: Cardinals

1970’s Highlights:
Won the 1970 Cy Young Award after going 23-7 with a 3.12 ERA and 274 strikeouts.. His 23 wins also lead the league; No-hit the Pirates, 8/14/71; Was the starting pitcher in the 1972 All-Star Game; Got his 3,000th strikeout on July 17, 1974, just the 2nd pitcher to reach that milestone; Was the Cardinals’ Opening Day starter each year he was active in the 1970s; Was the August 1970 NL Player of the month when he won all 6 of his starts with a 2.31 ERA, 55 strikeouts, a shutout and a 14-inning complete game

Career Highlights:
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1981; Dominated hitters in 1968 when he won both the MVP and Cy Young awards, lead the Majors with a 1.12 ERA, won a Gold Glove and was an All-Star; Pitched in 3 World Series, has a 7-2, 1.89 World Series record with 2 shutouts, averaged 10.2 K’s per 9 innings and was the MVP of the 1964 and 1967 World Series; Holds a World Series record by striking out 17 Tigers in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series; Won 9 Gold Glove Awards; Holds the Cardinals career records with 251 wins, 3,117 strikeouts, 482 starts, 3,884.1 innings pitched, 56 shutouts and 255 complete games;

Fun Stuff:
A basketball start at Creighton University, Gibson played for the Harlem Globetrotters in the winter of 1957/58


DAVE GIUSTI

1974 Topps #82

Played 1962 – 1977
1970’s Teams: Pirates, A’s, Cubs

1970’s Highlights:
Lead the league with 30 saves in 1970; Was named the 1971 NL Fireman of the Year by The Sporting News; Had 20 or more Saves in 4 straight seasons; Made the last pitch at Forbes Field 6/28/70; Got Cy Young votes in four seasons and MVP votes in two seasons

Career Highlights:
Won 15 games with the Astros in 1966; On August 21, 1966 Giusti drove in 6 runs and hurled a shutout in an 11-0 whitewashing of the Reds. The best part is that all six RBI came on a pair of two-out, bases loaded doubles, both times scoring Rusty Staub, Bob Aspromonte and Ron Brand

Fun Stuff:
Played for the 1961 Houston Buffs (AAA) before playing for 1962 Houston Colt .45s

His 1969 Season With St. Louis Deserves It’s Own Category:
The Cardinals acquired Giusti from the Astros in an October 1968 4-player trade, and then 3 days later they lost him to the Padres in the expansion draft. That December the Cardinals sent 4 players to San Diego to get Giusti back; Giusti’s 1969 Topps card lists him with the Padres on the front, shows him in an Astros uniform with the cap log blacked out and makes note of the trade back to St. Louis on the back of the card; The one nationally-issued card which shows Giusti in a Cardinals uniform is a 1989 Swell Baseball Greats card

Card Stuff:
Played in 1977 with A’s and Cubs, but his last card was 1977 Topps showing him with the Pirates; Had a solo Topps card every year from 1962 to 1977, even though he didn’t pitch in the Majors in 1963 and pitched just 8 games in 1964


DAVE GOLTZ

1978 Topps #249

Played 1972 – 1983
1970’s Teams: Twins

1970’s Highlights:
His 20 wins in 1977 tied Jim Palmer and Dennis Leonard for most in the AL; Got a 1st place vote in 1977 Cy Young voting, but finished 6th behind winner Sparky Lyle; Was the Twins Opening Day starter from 1977 to 1979; Threw a one-hit shutout of the Red Sox in 1977

Career Highlights:
Pitched in the postseason with the 1981 Dodgers and 1982 Angels

Fun Stuff:
Was the last Twins pitcher to bat before the implementation of the DH in 1973; Was the 8th native Minnesotan to play for the Twins

The 1970’s, A To Z: Ralph Garr to Cito Gaston

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


RALPH GARR

1975 Topps #550

Played 1968 – 1980
1970’s Teams: Braves, White Sox, Angels

1970’s Highlights:
In 1974 Garr lead the league with a .353 average, 214 hits and 17 triples and was an All-Star; Also lead league with 11 triples in 1975; Garr hit .299 or higher six times and finished 2nd in batting to Joe Torre in 1971 and to Billy Williams in 1972;  Was the NL Player of the Month for May, 1974… Over 25 games that month he batted. 427 with 21 runs scored, 11 RBI, 4 doubles, 3 triples, 5 homers and 5 stolen bases

Career Highlights:
Inducted into the Braves Hall of Fame, College Baseball Hall of Fame and the International League Hall of Fame

Fun Stuff:
His nickname is “Road Runner”; Was the first batter to ever face the Blue Jays… Bill Singer walked him, Garr stole 2nd, moved to 3rd on an error and scored on a sac fly

Card Stuff:
The same awesome photo was used in both 1974 and 1975 Topps


WAYNE GARRETT

1975 Topps #111

Played 1969 – 1978
1970’s Teams: Mets, Expos, Cardinals

1970’s Highlights:
Was the Mets’ starting 3rd Baseman from 1972 to 1975, and at the time he had the longest tenure of any Mets 3rd baseman (as the team previously had trouble finding someone to handle the hot corner)

Career Highlights:
Won a World Series with the 1969 “Miracle Mets”, platooning with Ed Charles and batting .385 in the 1969 NLCS; Garrett remains the only Mets 3rd baseman to play in two World Series (1969 and 1973)

Fun Stuff:
Wayne was the victim of Jim Bunning’s final strikeout (9/3/71); His brother Adrian played for the Cubs, Angels, A’s and Braves

Card Stuff:
This post’s featured card (with a John Milner cameo) isn’t the best from a photography standpoint, but I’ve always liked it; Garrett’s 1977 O-Pee-Chee card features a different photo; Was on a 1979 card with the Cardinals, but he played in Japan from 1979 to 1980

BONUS CARD – 1979 TCMA Japanese Baseball


STEVE GARVEY

1974 Topps #575

Played 1969 – 1987
1970’s Teams:  Dodgers

1970’s Highlights:
Was named the NL MVP in 1974 after batting .312 with 111 RBI, 95 runs, and 21 home runs; He also won a Gold Glove (the first of four straight), was named an All-Star (first of eight straight) and was named that year’s All-Star Game MVP; Was also the MVP of the 1978 All-Star Game; Was named the 1978 NLCS MVP after batting .389 with 4 homers, 7 RBI, 6 runs, a double, a triple and a homer over four games; His “Iron Man” streak of 1,207 consecutive games started on 9/3/75 (the streak would last into 1983)

Career Highlights:
Was an All-American 3rd Baseman in college; 1984 NLCS MVP; Got MVP votes in 8 straight season and 9 overall; Was remarkably consistent from 1974 to 1980… during that period his batting average was between .297 and .319 (.311 average), he had between 192 and 210 hits (average for that span = 201), between 78 and 95 runs (average 88), between 80 and 115 RBI (average 104); His #6 was retired by the Padres, the first number retired by that franchise, but the Dodgers have not retired it and #6 has been worn by 11 players over the past 20 years

Fun Stuff:
Had guest appearances on the TV shows Fantasy Island, Just Shoot Me and Baywatch; Was a defensive back at Michigan State

Card Stuff:
His 1977 OPC card is missing the All-Star banner


CLARENCE “CITO” GASTON

1974 Topps Washington “Nat’l Lea.” #364

Played 1967 – 1978
1970’s Teams: Padres, Braves, Pirates

1970’s Highlights:
As a player he had a career year in 1970 when he named to the All-Star team and batted .318 with 186 hits, 92 runs, 93 RBI and 29 homers; Many of his marks from that season would be Padres team records for much of the 1970s… His batting average was a team record until Tony Gwynn broke it in 1984, his 92 runs was a team record until Dave Winfield in 1977 and his 186 hits record stood until Gene Richards in 1980

Career Highlights:
Cito is best known for managing the Blue Jays between 1989 and 1997 and again from 2008 to 2010; During his first span he won 2 World Championships and four division titles; Was the first African-American manager to win a World Championship;  Inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 2002

Card Stuff:
Appeared in 1979 Topps airbrushed into a Pirates uniform, but played just 2 games for the Bucs at the end of 1978 and didn’t play in the majors after that; Was included in the 1971 Kellogg’s, Topps Coins and Topps Super sets

The 1970’s, A To Z: Oscar Gamble to Phil Garner

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


OSCAR GAMBLE

1975 Topps #213

Played 1969 – 1985
1970’s Teams: Phillies, Indians, Yankees, White Sox, Padres, Rangers

1970’s Highlights:
Had his best season with the White Sox in 1977 when he hit .297 and put up career-high numbers with 31 homers and 87 RBI;  In the last game at Philadelphia’s Connie Mack Stadium, Gamble got that ballpark’s last hit and RBI by hitting a game-winning 10th inning single to score Tim McCarver from 2nd

Fun Stuff:
Over his career he was traded six times, including two separate trades to the Yankees (November 1975 and July 1979)

Card Stuff:
Played for the White Sox in 1977 but didn’t appear on a mainstream card with them (He was airbrushed into a Padres cap in 1978 Topps after signing as a free agent);  Made his Major League debut with the Cubs in 1969, but his 1970 rookie card came after he was traded to the Phils


JIM GANTNER

1979 Topps #154

Played 1976 – 1992
1970’s Teams: Brewers

1970’s Highlights:
Had two September callups in 1976 and 1977 before sticking with the team for good in 1978;  pitched an inning of relief in a 1979 blowout loss to the Royals, and of the six players who pitched in that game (including position players Sal Bando and Buck Martinez), Gantner was the only one to not give up a run

Career Highlights:
Won a World Series with the 1982 “Brew Crew”, batting .333 with 5 runs and 4 RBI;  Holds Brewers career record with 106 sacrifices; Inducted into the Brewers Walk of Fame and Wall of Honor

Fun Stuff:
His nickname is “Gumby”


GENE GARBER

1976 SSPC #458

Played 1969 – 1988
1970’s Teams: Pirates, Royals, Phillies, Braves

1970’s Highlights:
On August 1, 1978 Garber pitched 3 innings and got a Save in a blowout win over the Reds… but more importantly he got Pete Rose out twice, including a game-ending strikeout, to bring Rose’s 44 game hitting streak to an end; Lead the league with 71 appearances in 1975; In his final stint as a starting pitcher (with the Royals in 1973) he pitched four complete games

Career Highlights:
Saved 218 games over 19 seasons; Was the Braves all-time leader in Saves when he was traded in 1987, a record which stood until John Smoltz broke it in 2004 (Craig Kimbrel has since passed them both); Had some consideration in 1982 Cy Young and MVP voting after earning 30 saves and had a 2.34 ERA

Fun Stuff:
The only alumnus of Elizabethtown (PA) HS to make the Majors, and one of three (and the only one with more than 40 games) from Elizabethtown College; Is the only pitcher with at least 200 career saves to have never been an All-Star


WAYNE GARLAND

1977 Kelloggs #21

Played 1973 – 1981
1970’s Teams: Orioles, Indians

1970’s Highlights:
Went 20-7 in 1976, but was overshadowed on the Orioles by Jim Palmer, who bested him in all major categories; His 20-win season nevertheless got him a 10-year, $2.3 Million free agent contract with the Indians that, at least for me, still serves as a cautionary tale against giving long contracts to pitchers… He lead the league with 19 losses in his first season, suffered from injuries to his rotator cuff, had a 28-48 record over 5 seasons with Cleveland and would end up getting released after those five seasons

Fun Stuff:
While he was pitching for the Orioles, he gave up Boog Powell’s final homer (#339, in 1976 when Boog was with Cleveland)


PHIL GARNER

1978 Topps #203

Played 1973 – 1988
1970’s Teams: A’s, Pirates

1970’s Highlights:
Won a World Championship in 1979 and in that World Series he batted .500 and got a hit in every game and also set a World Series record for 2nd basemen with 7 double plays;  In 1978 he hit grand slams in two consecutive games, a feat that had not been accomplished in the National League in 77 years;  Was involved in a triple play vs Braves on 7/23/79

Career Highlights:
Three-time All-Star;  Managed the Brewers, Tigers and Astros between 1992 to 2007

Fun Stuff:
His nickname is “Scrap Iron”

Card Stuff:
His 1977 O-Pee-Chee card has a different photo and shows him in an airbrushed Pirates cap


The 1970’s, A To Z: Danny Frisella to Alan Gallagher

Recap: I’m going through all of the notable and somewhat notable players and managers of the 1970’s and I’m basically making like it’s an all-encompassing 1970’s throwback baseball card set. For the “card front”, I’m sharing my favorite 1970’s card of that guy. I’m also including a card back’s worth of information and thoughts about him and his cardboard.


DANNY FRISELLA

1972 Topps #293

Played 1967 – 1976
1970’s Teams: Mets, Braves, Padres, Cardinals, Brewers

1970’s Highlights:
One of the top relievers in 1971 and was half of a formidable lefty/righty combination with Tug McGraw… Frisella’s 12 saves lead the Mets that year, and his 1.99 ERA was better than any Mets pitcher not named McGraw or Seaver

Sad Stuff:
Died in a freak dune buggy accident on January 1, 1977

Fun Stuff:
Was taught his forkball by Diego Segui during winter baseball


WOODIE FRYMAN

1976 SSPC #345

Played 1966 – 1983
1970’s Teams: Phillies, Tigers, Expos, Reds, Cubs

1970’s Highlights:
An All-Star in 1976 with the Expos (although he didn’t pitch in the game) and the Reds opening day starter 1977; Was named the Expos Player of the Year in 1976 when he lead the 107-loss team with a 13-13 record;

Career Highlights:
Was named the LHP on the 1966 Topps All-Star Rookie Team; Inducted into the Expos Hall of Fame in 1995; Faced the minimum of 27 batters in a 7/1/66 start against the Mets after Ron Hunt lead off with a single, was caught stealing and then Fryman was perfect for the rest of his 12-0 shutout over New York; Was named to the 1968 All-Star team with the Phillies (but didn’t pitch in that ASG either)

Fun Stuff:
Originally signed by the Pirates when he attended a tryout camp at the relatively old age of 25, he earned a spot on the Big League team as a non-roster invite in his first Spring Training; Was involved in two separate trades involving HOFers (Jim Bunning and Tony Perez)

Card Stuff:
His 1977 O-Pee-Chee card has photo different than Topps and also has him airbrushed into a Reds cap; Topps listed him as “Woody” from his 1966 rookie card through 1969, and then corrected it to “Woodie” starting in 1970; People have called the vehicle on his 1976 SSPC card a bullpen cart, but I’m pretty sure it’s a cart used by the Shea Stadium grounds crew


TITO FUENTES

1976 Topps #8

Played 1965 – 1978
1970’s Teams: Giants, Padres, Tigers, A’s

1970’s Highlights:
Got some MVP votes (although no first place votes) in 1973, a year where he hit a career best 63 RBI and lead NL 2nd basemen in assists and fielding percentage; his six errors at 2nd base in 1973 was, at the time, a record for a player appearing in at least 160 games;  Hit a 2-run homer in the 1971 NLCS against the Pirates

Career Highlights:
Finished 3rd in 1966 NL Rookie of the Year voting (behind Sonny Jackson and winner Tommy Helms)

Fun Stuff:
Last Tigers player before Alan Trammell to wear #3; Was among the last players signed directly out of Cuba before the embargo; A fan-favorite in San Francisco, Fuentes is currently a member of the Giants’ Spanish language broadcast team

Card Stuff:
Was well-known by card-collecting kids as the guy who wore his sweatband – often with his name on it – outside of his cap


Fuentes is the last of the Fs; now it’s time to move on to G. This divider is pretty obvious for the most part, but whoever correctly names where the first “G” comes from gets bragging rights for the course of the weekend.


RICH GALE

1979 Topps #298

Played 1978 – 1984
1970’s Teams: Royals

1970’s Highlights:
After his 1978 rookie season where he went 14-8 with a 3.09 ERA, Gale was named the Sporting News AL Rookie Pitcher of the Year and was also included in the the Topps and Baseball Digest Rookie All-Star teams; He was also the only pitcher to get consideration for the 1978 AL Rookie of the Year award (Lou Whitaker was the winner)

Career Highlights:
Pitched in the World Series with the 1980 Royals; Would help the Hanshin Tigers win their first-ever Japan Series in 1985; Was the Boston Red Sox’ pitching coach in 1992 and 1993

Fun Stuff:
The only player from Littleton (NH) High School to pitch in the Majors and is the last baseball player from the University of New Hampshire to make the majors (the school dropped baseball in the 1990s); Standing at 6’7″, when he made his debut he joined Baltimore’s Tim Stoddard as the tallest players in the American League

Card Stuff:
His 1985 Topps card shows him with the Red Sox but he would pitch in Japan that season and the next (so that card reflects his final MLB career statistics)


AL GALLAGHER

1972 Topps #694

Played 1970 – 1973
1970’s Teams: Giants, Angels

1970’s Highlights:
Was named the 3rd baseman on the 1970 Topps All-Star Rookie team

Career Highlights:
Had a long career managing in the minors, mostly for independent teams

Fun Stuff:
Was the first native of San Francisco to play for the Giants after their move west; His full name was Alan Mitchell Edward George Patrick Henry Gallagher, which tied him with Christian Frederick Albert John Henry David “Bruno” Betzel for most names in MLB history (Betzel played from 1914 to 1918); Gallagher’s nickname, “Dirty Al”, was not about him being unsportsmanlike, it was a nickname he got in college when he wore the same unwashed uniform (including undergarments) every day during a 25-game hitting streak

Card Stuff:
Even though he appeared in 82 games in 1972 and 113 games (mostly with the Angels) in 1973, he didn’t appear on a baseball card after 1972